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This nearly identical to this question with two differences.

  1. I want to run unit tests right before commit and not all of the time (accepted answer).
  2. The answers and comments to the question seem to indicate that the suggested plugins are no longer supported.

Basic problem I am trying to solve is simply forgetting to run unit tests for small quick changes and it seems it should be possible to automate.

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The one I mentioned on that other question, Infinitest, is definitely still supported, and is in fact open-source now! :) But that doesn't address item #1... –  MatrixFrog Jun 14 '11 at 17:20
    
@MatrixFrog: please post this as an answer; There may not be a good solution for (1) but this is seems like a very good plugin to evaluate. –  Andrew White Jun 14 '11 at 18:48
    
+1 @MatrixFrog - Infinitest is consider to be the best CT utility by many. –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 20:40
    
@#1 - "not all of the time"? If your tests are fast enough, why not run them all the time? It still solves the problem you are mentioning which is forgetting to run them before committing. I would just use the answer from the linked to question. –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 20:42
    
@Gweebz: there could be hundres or even thousands of tests which may impose a bit of a load for a lot of editing/saving. Infinitest looks like it may solve this with some smarts on what tests to run. –  Andrew White Jun 14 '11 at 21:21
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

On the question you linked to, I mentioned Infinitest. It doesn't fit your item #1, but it only reruns tests that are likely to have broken (presumably it does some kind of clever code analysis -- I don't know the details) so you might find it useful anyway. It is definitely still supported, and in fact it's now open source!

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I have not used Infinitest but it is worth mentioning that they claim it can be configured to only run tests which are affected by the code changes occuring. That way it doesn't run them all, all the time. Instead, it figures out what code paths may be affected by any change and re-runs only the relevant tests. Worth a look if you ask me... –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 20:43
    
@Gweebz That's exactly what I meant by "tests that are likely to have broken" but you explained it much more clearly than me. Feel free to edit my answer if you like. –  MatrixFrog Jun 14 '11 at 22:44
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Basic problem I am trying to solve is simply forgetting to run unit tests for small quick changes and it seems it should be possible to automate.

If your tests are fast, you can run them on each save. See this blog by Misko Hevery

Alternatively, you could use a commit hook to run the tests before accepting the update.

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interesting. The SVN hook idea would be nice IF it could run locally but it appears the hooks must be run on the svn server (unless I am missing something). Doing tests on-save may be good enough but I would have to adapt that blog post to work with Maven since it is rather ant centric. –  Andrew White Jun 14 '11 at 18:45
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