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I'm making an dictionary app for android. This app uses stardict and DICT files which is are often pretty large (10MB or more) and contains just plain texts.

When users look up a word, my app will read the file randomly and return the result. I've read on some articles that reading file is expensive and slow. So I wonder if bringing all data into database is a better solution?

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What is more important to you, speed or ease of development? You may be able to write something as fast, or faster using 'interpolation search', but it will take you longer to implement. –  Dana the Sane Jun 14 '11 at 17:23
    
My goal is to return the result to the users as fast as possible. Thanks for the algorithm, I will give it a read. –  Genzer Jun 14 '11 at 17:26
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I would suggest putting your words into a database for the following reasons:

  1. DB lookups on android with SQLite are "fast enough" (~1ms) for even the most impatient of users
  2. Reading large files into memory is a dangerous practice in memory-limited environments such as android.
  3. Trying to read entries out of a file "in place" rather than "in memory" is effectively trying to solve all the problems that SQLite already solves for you.

The only challenge presented in using a database is initializing it with the data you require. This problem can best be solved by creating the desired database in advance and then attaching it to your APK assets. There is an example here that is quite good.

Hope this helps.

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There was a study done by the JSlovo dictionary project: http://jwork.org/jslovo/ (they have dictionaries for Java and Android with a similar concept). To read many dictionary files while searching for a definition is much faster and less memory consuming compare to any dictionary based on SQLite or and other SQL database. The dictionary for the Android platform even shows the access time for each search.

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thanks for the information. –  Genzer Jul 27 '11 at 5:45
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