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Does anyone have a quick way to randomly return either 1 or -1?

Something like this probably works, but seems less than ideal:

return Random.nextDouble() > .5 ? 1 : -1;
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1  
What's wrong with that ? –  Mike Kwan Jun 14 '11 at 18:09
1  
you're asking for ideal solutions when working with random numbers? ;) –  asgs Jun 14 '11 at 18:10
7  
Random.nextBoolean() ? 1 : -1 –  leonbloy Jun 14 '11 at 18:10
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return -1; // randomly chosen –  Erick Robertson Jun 14 '11 at 18:23
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6 Answers

how about:

random.nextBoolean() ? 1 : -1;

where random is an instance of java.util.Random

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+1 Because this is the simplest of all the answers (some are really clever). However, just want to add that it is likely that the same Random instance should generally be used instead of always creating a new one ... otherwise leads to interesting "duplicate values" in degenerate situations. –  user166390 Jun 14 '11 at 18:14
    
This one wins because it is intuitive and readable. –  Kyle Jun 14 '11 at 18:14
    
@pst agreed on that. I just wanted to fit it on one line. I'll remove the instantiation. –  Bozho Jun 14 '11 at 18:17
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Warning: you don't want to code this line inside a loop, it would not work! A single random object should be created outside. –  leonbloy Jun 14 '11 at 18:17
    
@leonbloy just addressed that. The example was simplified, now it's more complete. –  Bozho Jun 14 '11 at 18:17
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return Random.nextInt(2) * 2 - 1;
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2  
@JustinKSU: No it wouldn't. The nextInt produces 0 or 1, which doubles to 0 or 2, which then becomes -1 or 1. The nextInt value is exclusive. –  Peter Alexander Jun 14 '11 at 18:12
    
nice..but certainly hard to read.. +1 anyway. –  Bozho Jun 14 '11 at 18:14
    
You are correct. I was wrong. –  JustinKSU Jun 14 '11 at 18:14
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new Random.nextInt(2) == 0 ? -1 : 1;

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nextInt(integer) is between 0 (inclusively) and int (exclusively). thus you need Random.nextInt(2) –  iliaden Jun 14 '11 at 18:13
    
Corrected. Thank you. –  JustinKSU Jun 14 '11 at 18:15
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How about

Random r = new Random();
n = r.nextInt(2) * 2 - 1;
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return Math.floor(Math.random()*2)*2-1;
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3  
Eschew obfuscation! –  delnan Jun 14 '11 at 18:13
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import java.util.Random;

public class RandomTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        System.out.println(randomOneOrMinusOne());

    }
}
static int randomOneOrMinusOne() {
    Random rand = new Random();
    if (rand.nextBoolean()) return 1;
    else return -1;
}

}

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