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I have a page where the infamous 3px extra vertical space (below each li element) is being rendered in IE7 on all my list items. I have a specific situation where I need text absolutely positioned within the li, so that its container can be set to a smaller width, & the text extends beyond the container. Here's the code I'm using:

<style type="text/css">
 div { width: 160px; font: 8pt arial,helvetica,sans-serif; border: 1px solid #999; }
  div ul { margin: 0; padding: 0; list-style: none; }
   div ul li { width: 30px; height: 20px; margin: 0 0 4px; padding: 0; background-color: #c00; }
    div ul li a { display: block; line-height: 20px; color: #000; text-decoration: none; }
     div ul li a em { position: absolute; margin-left: 5px; }
</style>

<div>
 <ul>
  <li><a href="#"><em>#1: premature brake wear</em></a></li>
  <li><a href="#"><em>#2: squeaky brakes</em></a></li>
  <li><a href="#"><em>#3: bad gas mileage</em></a></li>
 </ul>
</div>

I'm looking for a solution that doesn't involve an IE7-specific CSS hack, just for CSS purity's sake. I've read that in a lot of cases, giving the containing elements hasLayout resolves most of these 3px extra height issues, but I haven't been able to figure it out for this code.

In my app, I ended up applying a different margin-bottom for IE7 (1px rather than 4px) which works fine but just doesn't seem right....

Test page here

Live app here

I've tried some of the standard fixes described on 456 Berea St & this page, but either I'm applying them incorrectly to my example, or it's something else in the way my code is structured. Any suggestions for fixes or other ways to accomplish this layout?

share|improve this question
    
you can give the div ul li { float: left; clear: left; } but I don't think that's any clearer than just adjusting the margins. –  Joshua Shannon Mar 11 '09 at 15:46
    
I tried this on my example code, but didn't see any effect on the 3px extra space. Thanks for your help on this –  Wick Mar 11 '09 at 16:05
    
I updated my answer, it's now an alternate way of accomplishing the layout you want. –  Joshua Shannon Mar 11 '09 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try the following:

<style type="text/css">
    div.test { width: 160px; font: 8pt arial,helvetica,sans-serif; border: 1px solid #999; overflow:hidden; }
    div.test ul { margin: 0; padding: 0; list-style: none;}
    div.test ul li { margin: 0 0 4px; }
    div.test ul li a { display: inline-block; }
    div.test ul li a { display: block; padding: 0 5px; line-height: 20px; color: #000; text-decoration: none; position: relative; z-index: 2; }
    div.test ul li b {   background-color: #c00; height: 20px; width: 20px; position: absolute; display: block; z-index: 1; }
</style>

<div class="test">
    <ul>
        <li><b></b><a href="#"><em>#1: premature brake wear</em></a></li>
        <li><b></b><a href="#"><em>#2: squeaky brakes</em></a></li>
        <li><b></b><a href="#"><em>#3: bad gas mileage</em></a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

I couldn't fix the problem you were having any cleaner than what you already have (the other fix is to float the LI's and clear them) however, I am giving you an alternative way of doing this. I admit it's the cleanest HTML, but it does neatly sidestep the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this gets closer - it's the same fix described in the 456 Berea St. link I mentioned, I think - but something about the absolutely positioned element still creates the 3px extra space. If I take away "position: absolute" on the em, the bug goes away ... but I need that. –  Wick Mar 11 '09 at 16:02
    
(looks like you edited your answer, so my comment above doesn't apply anymore) ... so it's only when the absolutely positioned element is nested within the block element? Interesting.. thanks again –  Wick Mar 11 '09 at 16:10
    
I'll leave the question open for a bit to see what others have to say, but this is the best so far –  Wick Mar 11 '09 at 16:10

I haven't tried it with this code, but I've specified a height in the li elements, then added vertical-align: bottom, so the code would be:

div.test ul li { height: 20px; vertical-align: bottom;}

Works for me in both ie 6 & 7

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, better and easiest solution! –  skyline26 May 14 '12 at 11:02
    
I also had this problem in IE 10/11 and this fixed it. Thanks. –  nanny Aug 20 '13 at 13:51

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