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I get the error Command/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneSimulator.platform/Developer/usr/bin/llvm-g++-4.2 failed with exit code 1 whenever I put a global variable id theScene in a .mm file. It works with a .m file but I need .mm for box2d implementation later on. Also, I think the real error resides here:

ld: duplicate symbol _theScene in /Users/sgupta100/Documents/TheifGame/build/TheifGame.build/Release-iphonesimulator/TheifGame.build/Objects-normal/i386/HelloWorldScene.o and /Users/sgupta100/Documents/TheifGame/build/TheifGame.build/Release-iphonesimulator/TheifGame.build/Objects-normal/i386/TheifGameAppDelegate.o

I do not know what this really means so can someone explain?

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Is this variable declared in a header somewhere? If so, does the declaration use the extern keyword? If it doesn't, the compiler will emit a symbol for each compilation unit (.m, .mm, .c, .cpp, etc.) that #includes the header.

If the header isn't a problem, something in both your "HelloWorldScene" and "TheifGameAppDelegate" compilations unit is producing a theScene symbol. Either the variable is defined in both, or something else, such as a function, happens to have the same name.

Without posting your code or other details, there's no more I can tell you about this issue.

Update: the correct way to use global variables across multiple files is to declare the variable as extern in a header (conditionally use extern "C" when compiling with (Objective-)C++ and the variable also needs to be accessible from (Objective-)C. Then define it exactly once in a .m, .mm, .c or .cpp file without the extern and possibly with an initialiser. The header must of course be included by all files that require access to the variable.

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Yeah I had to declare the variable in the .mm file as well. –  dgTheUser Jun 20 '11 at 2:31
    
The correct way to do this is to declare the variable as extern in a header (conditionally use extern "C" when compiling with (Objective-)C++ and the variable also needs to be accessible from (Objective-)C. Then define it exactly once in a .m, .mm, .c or .cpp file without the extern and possibly with an initialiser. I suspect the reason it "works" when yo declare it in a .mm file is that it actually isn't the same variable anymore, i.e. if you change it in one file, the other file won't see the change. Look up C vs. C++ linkage. –  pmdj Jun 20 '11 at 12:46
    
You can't override global variables based on type, only method and function names. As such, 'extern "C"' is not needed in this case, as it only tells the compiler to not apply the name mangling needed for overrides. Use the plain 'extern' keyword when DECLARING the global, and leave it out where you actually DEFINE the global. –  uliwitness Jan 23 '13 at 9:24
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