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Just for fun, I was investigating the order of dynamic initialization of static objects. In a file name t.h, I put

struct T {
   static std::vector<std::string> me;
   static int add(std::string s) { me.push_back(s); return me.size(); }
};

(Plus needed headers for vector and string.) "std::vector T::me" is in t.cpp. The file main.cpp prints out the values in T::me:

#include "t.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    T::me.push_back("main");
    cout << "T::me.size()=" << T::me.size() << endl;
    for (unsigned i = 0; i<T::me.size(); ++i) {
        cout << i << "-" << T::me[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

next, I create "a.cpp" and put the following in it:

#include "t.h"

int a = T::add("a");

Do the similar for file b.cpp and c.cpp using "b" and "c" as appropriate. Compile using g++ *.cpp, then run ./a.out. The order of static initialization from compilation unit to compilation unit is unspecified. In my case it is consistently in reverse alphabetical order. I get: 3 - c 2 - b 1 - a 0 - main

No problems so far.

Now I create u.cpp like a.cpp but using "u". Recompile/rerun, "u" does not show up in the list.

Is it because I never referenced u? I never referenced a,b,c, but I change main:

#include "t.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

extern int u;

int main()
{
    cout << "u=" << u << endl;
    T::me.push_back("main");
    cout << "T::me.size()=" << T::me.size() << endl;
    for (unsigned i = 0; i<T::me.size(); ++i) {
        cout << i << "-" << T::me[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

The program prints out "u=2", but "u" is not in the list. Shouldn't u have been dynamically initialized before use and, therefore, T::me have been updated to include "u"? I think there should be a better explanation than that u comes after t in the alphabet.

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2  
Need I point out that trying to figure out the specifics of officially unspecified behavior is but one step removed from relying on those specifics, and we as a community don't want any of that? –  Seva Alekseyev Jun 14 '11 at 19:37
    
"Just for fun" is a reasonable excuse for this. I'm willing to give OP the benefit of the doubt they won't be shipping any production code that depends on this behavior, whatever it may be found to be. But by that logic, maybe it should be moved to programmers.stackexchange.com –  jeffamaphone Jun 14 '11 at 19:38
    
I don't think my question is in the realm of unspecified behavior. If I asked "when is u initialized w.r.t. a,b,c..." that would be unspecified. –  John Jun 14 '11 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've got it. Simple, really. T::me is zero initialized statically according to the rules of C++. There is a constructor, however, to run dynamically. There's no guarantee when that constructor runs. It is apparently - in this case - running after u is initialized.

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It seems that the compilation linking order matters:

g++ -o m a.cpp u.cpp t.cpp main.cpp

gives

a=2
u=1
T::me.size()=3
0-u
1-a
2-main

but

g++ -o m main.cpp t.cpp a.cpp u.cpp

gives

a=2
u=1
T::me.size()=1
0-main

and reversing a.cpp and u.cpp in the last case causes a=1 and u=2.

Interesting!

share|improve this answer
    
It's actually the order of linking: use g++ -c to compile each module, then use g++ to link them in different orders. –  John Jun 14 '11 at 20:05
    
Yes, of course, good point! –  Kerrek SB Jun 14 '11 at 20:07

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