Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a comprehensive list of known APIs for desktop or browser environments?

share|improve this question
    
That is a really broad question. Are you interested in APIs or implementations? Are there any language or platform choices you could make to limit this? –  Michael Levy Jun 14 '11 at 22:40
    
I know that there are really few good solutions, so I decided that I choose the platform (in a broad sense) and programming language based on availability of good text-to-speech and speech-to-text for them. –  Halst Jun 15 '11 at 9:21
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I'll rehash and update an answer from How can i do speech recognition in C or Java or PHP?. This is by no means comprehensive, but it might be a start for you


From watching these questions for few months, I've seen most developer choices break down like this:

Windows folks - use the System.Speech features of .Net or Microsoft.Speech and install the free recognizers Microsoft provides. Windows 7 includes a full speech engine. Others are downloadable for free. There is a C++ API to the same engines known as SAPI. See at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163663.aspx. or http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms723627(v=vs.85).aspx. More background on Microsoft engines for Windows What is the difference between System.Speech.Recognition and Microsoft.Speech.Recognition?

Linux folks - Sphinx seems to have a good following. See http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/ and http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/

Commercial products - Nuance, Loquendo, AT&T, IBM, others. Each provide their own SDKs and libraries for various languages.

Online service - Nuance, Yapme, ispeech.org, vlingo, others. Nuance has improved their developer program and will now give you free access to their services for development. Yap (I believe) was recently purchased by Amazon, so we may see some changes there.

Of course this may also be helpful - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_speech_recognition_software

There is a Java speech API. See javax.speech.recognition in the Java Speech API http://java.sun.com/products/java-media/speech/forDevelopers/jsapi-guide/Recognition.html. I believe you still have to find a speech engine that supports this API. I don't think Sphinx fully supports it - http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/sphinx4/doc/Sphinx4-faq.html#support_jsapi

There are lots of other SO quesitons: Need text to speech and speech recognition tools for Linux and pyspeech (python) - Transcribe mp3 files? which talks about http://code.google.com/p/pyspeech/. You may also want to look at http://code.google.com/p/dragonfly/

share|improve this answer
    
Another unofficial online service that you missed is Google's Speech API. Here is a link to some API hooks in Java: github.com/The-Shadow/java-speech-api –  Skylion Feb 1 at 19:19
    
I don't believe Google ever made their speech API publicly accessible. People have reverse engineered it and used it, but I don't believe Google supports it for 3rd party use. I believe it is only intended to be used by Chrome browser or Android operating system. See stackoverflow.com/a/12727910/90236 or stackoverflow.com/a/7889565/90236 –  Michael Levy Feb 2 at 23:30
add comment

The leading API vendors of text to speech (voice generation) are YAKiToMe! and iSpeech. YAKiToMe! is the one I use because I like their voice quality the best and they're the least expensive (mostly free). They support male and female speakers in multiple languages. Some of the voice vendors, like Acapella, Nuance, Loquendo and iVona have decent voices but tend to be expensive to use.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is how you can do it. Note: it is an api from goofle. works only in chrome browser. I hope this will get you a start.

(See live demo and download full source code here http://purpledesign.in/blog/?p=33)

define a button or something like this

<input id="speech" type="text" speech="speech" x-webkit-speech="x-webkit-speech" onspeechchange="processspeech();" onwebkitspeechchange="processspeech();" />

and define what you want to do in a function in your javascript file

Like This

   function processspeech()
   {
     var speechtext=$("#speech").val();
     var elem = document.getElementById("test");
     elem.value = speechtext;
     var notification="\"<span style=\"color:#F00; text-transform:uppercase;\">"+  speechtext + "</span>\" <br />*Is this what you said???";
    notify(notification);
}

Here

<textarea> id="test"></textarea>

The speech is written in the textarea

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.