Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to somehow pass the scope of a function to another?

For example,

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   b(<my-scope>);
}

function b(){
   //access x or obj....
}

I would rather access the variables directly, i.e., not using anything like this.a or this.obj, but just use x or obj directly.

share|improve this question
    
By scope do you mean just methods or also values of all initialized in a() variables, etc ? btw (+1) for good question. –  Dmitriy Naumov Jun 14 '11 at 19:23
    
what do u mean? –  ciochPep Jun 14 '11 at 19:24
1  
Also, you should accept answers to your questions if you've found them to be useful(See there is a tick there)and also use upvotes. It will help you get more answers. –  Rishabh Jun 14 '11 at 19:25

11 Answers 11

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The only way to truly get access to function a's private scope is to declare b inside of a so it forms a closure that allows implicit access to a's variables.

Here are some options for you.

Direct Access

  1. Declare b inside of a.

    function a() {
       var x = 5,
          obj = {};
       function b(){
          // access x or obj...
       }
       b();
    }
    
    a();
    
  2. If you don't want b inside of a, then you could have them both inside a larger container scope:

    function container() {
       var x, obj;
       function a(){
          x = 5;
          obj = {..};
          b();
       }
       function b(){
          // access x or obj...
       }
    }
    
    container.a();
    

These are the only ways you're going to be able to use a's variables directly in b without some extra code to move things around. If you are content with a little bit of "help" and/or indirection, here are a few more ideas.

Indirect Access

  1. You can just pass the variables as parameters, but won't have write access except to properties of objects:

    function a() {
       var x = 5,
          obj = {};
       b(x, obj);
    }
    
    function b(x, obj){
       // access x or obj...
       // changing x here won't change x in a, but you can modify properties of obj
    }
    
    a();
    

    As a variation on this you could get write access by passing updated values back to a like so:

    // in a:
    var ret = b(x, obj);
    x = ret.x;
    obj = ret.obj;
    
    // in b:
    return {x : x, obj : obj};
    
  2. You could pass b an object with getters and setters that can access a's private variables:

    function a(){
       var x = 5,
          obj = {..},
          translator = {
             getX : function() {return x;},
             setX : function(value) {x = value;},
             getObj : function() {return obj;},
             setObj : function(value) {obj = value;}
          };
       b(translator);
    }
    
    function b(t){
       var x = t.getX(),
          obj = t.getObj();
    
       // use x or obj...
       t.setX(x);
       t.setObj(obj);
    
       // or you can just directly modify obj's properties:
       obj.key = value;
    }
    
    a();
    

    The getters and setters could be public, assigned to the this object of a, but this way they are only accessible if explicitly given out from within a.

  3. And you could put your variables in an object and pass the object around:

    function a(){
       var v = {
          x : 5,
          obj : {}
       };
       b(v);
    }
    
    function b(v){
       // access v.x or v.obj...
       // or set new local x and obj variables to these and use them.
    }
    
    a();
    

    As a variation you can construct the object at call time instead:

    function a(){
       var x = 5,
          obj = {};
       b({x : x, obj: obj});
    }
    
    function b(v){
       // access v.x or v.obj...
       // or set new local x and obj variables to these and use them.
    }
    
    a();
    
share|improve this answer

Scope is created by functions, and a scope stays with a function, so the closest thing to what you're asking will be to pass a function out of a() to b(), and that function will continue to have access to the scoped variables from a().

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   b(function() { /* this can access var x and var obj */ });
}
function b( fn ){

    fn(); // the function passed still has access to the variables from a()

}

While b() doesn't have direct access to the variables that the function passed does, data types where a reference is passed, like an Object, can be accessed if the function passed returns that object.

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   b(function() { x++; return obj; });
}
function b( fn ){

    var obj = fn();
    obj.some_prop = 'some value'; // This new property will be updated in the
                                  //    same obj referenced in a()

}
share|improve this answer
    
@gion It's funny because this is really no different than my getters/setters example. You run a function that was passed to b and it returns the variable you want. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:05
    
@Erik: let it go. It's not that funny and it's a bit different. –  gion_13 Jun 14 '11 at 20:08
    
@patrick Where is the access to variable a in b? @gion sure, okay. :) –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:10
    
@Erik: There is none, except in whatever capacity the function allows manipulation. "While b() doesn't have direct access to the variables..." –  user113716 Jun 14 '11 at 20:13
    
In that case, this doesn't seem to meet the question's requirements... ? –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:18

No.

You're accessing the local scope object. The [[Context]].

You cannot publicly access it.

Now since it's node.js you should be able to write a C++ plugin that gives you access to the [[Context]] object. I highly recommend against this as it brings proprietary extensions to the JavaScript language.

share|improve this answer
2  
Any reason for a downvote? If you can access [[Context]] please do let me know. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 19:41
    
Just gave you an up vote. If any one writes this extension I would love to know and then it is not proprietary. It blows my mind that people refer to bind this as changing scope. All you are doing is changing a reference to an object and including it into the scope of the function. To actually change real "scope" you need to do as you said here and change the frame in which these things point at. –  James Andino Mar 8 '12 at 13:17

what about using bind

function funcA(param) {     
    var bscoped = funcB.bind(this);     
    bscoped(param1,param2...)
}
share|improve this answer

As others have said, you cannot pass scope like that. You can however scope variables properly using self executing anonymous functions (or immediately executing if you're pedantic):

(function(){
    var x = 5;
    var obj = {x:x};
    module.a = function(){
        module.b();
    };
    module.b = function(){
        alert(obj.x);    
    };
}());

a();
share|improve this answer
    
Error: window is undefined –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 19:42
1  
Don't be pedantic Raynos. –  david Jun 14 '11 at 19:45
    
it's annoying when people don't read the question and use browser js. It's just as bad as using jQuery in JavaScript only questions. this is module instead of window so just write to that. I also highly recommend againts overwriting global as that's the real global scope in node.js (and it may have unknown side-effects) –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 19:47
    
@Raynos, I read the question, and knew it was in node. The window keyword was in there because I tested it in jsfiddle first, rather than blindly spewing code and hoping it works. My bad for not proofreading it again. –  david Jun 14 '11 at 19:50

I think the simplest thing you can do is pass variables from one scope to a function outside that scope. If you pass by reference (like Objects), b has 'access' to it (see obj.someprop in the following):

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {someprop : 1};
   b(x, obj);
   alert(x); => 5
   alert(obj.someprop); //=> 'otherval'
}
function b(aa,obj){
   x += 1; //won't affect x in function a, because x is passed by value
   obj.someprop = 'otherval'; //change obj in function a, is passed by reference
}
share|improve this answer
    
As given, your b function will be accessing a global a and obj, not the ones in a. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:09
    
Yep, forgot the params in b(), edited, and by the way renamed var a, because that may conflict with the function name (jshint.com complained) –  KooiInc Jun 14 '11 at 20:12
    
Same here, I renamed to x. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:13

You can't "pass the scope"... not that I know of.
You can pass the object that the function is referring to by using apply or call and send the current object (this) as the first parameter instead of just calling the function:

function b(){
    alert(this.x);
}
function a(){
    this.x = 2;
    b.call(this);
}

The only way for a function to access a certain scope is to be declared in that scope.
Kind'a tricky.
That would lead to something like :

function a(){
    var x = 1;
    function b(){
        alert(x);
    }
}

But that would kind of defeat the purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
@Erik that's redundant. If I want to pass the vars as arguments, I wouldn't need scope. –  gion_13 Jun 14 '11 at 19:42
    
@gion See my answer (third code block). I was suggesting something a little different than passing them as arguments. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 19:49
    
@Erik I know. You want to pass an object that would "simulate" the scope.I'm not saying it's wrong or that it won't work. It's great, but it's not quite the answer for this question. –  gion_13 Jun 14 '11 at 19:54
    
@gion I find it helpful to give more choices instead of only answering exactly what was asked. For example, "you CAN do this with dynamic SQL but you probably shouldn't, here are other options". Anyway, I didn't downvote you if that's what you're thinking. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 19:57
    
@Erik: it has nothing to do with node.js. see java-samples.com/showtutorial.php?tutorialid=829 for more info –  gion_13 Jun 15 '11 at 11:37
function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   var b = function()
   {
        document.println(x);
   }
   b.call();
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's not the best answer, but it's a good one. One of the ways to pass the scope is by defining the function in that scope, so stop downvoting this –  gion_13 Jun 14 '11 at 19:58
    
Shawn there's no need for b.call();. Just b(); directly. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 22:18
    
b.call() is classier imo –  Shawn Jun 14 '11 at 23:38

You can create your variables without the var keyword and they will be global, but no way to pass the scope that I'm aware of...

share|improve this answer
3  
i rather not to pollute the global or any other scopes.. –  ciochPep Jun 14 '11 at 19:23
    
I never said it was a good idea... –  ShaneBlake Jun 14 '11 at 19:56
function a(){
   this.x = 5;
   this.obj = {..};
   var self = this;
   b(self);
}
function b(scope){
   //access x or obj....

}
share|improve this answer
    
you can do b(this) as well –  gion_13 Jun 14 '11 at 19:38
    
This is context, rather than scope. –  david Jun 14 '11 at 19:41

Have you tried something like this:

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   b(this);
}
function b(fnA){
   //access x or obj....
   fnA.obj = 6;
}

If you can stand function B as a method function A then do this:

function a(){
   var x = 5;
   var obj = {..};
   b(this);

   this.b = function (){
      // "this" keyword is still === function a
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
1. There's no need for using this at all. Just declaring b inside of a will automatically grant b access to a's private variables. 2. Using the this keyword in b will not give access to the private variables so this.obj will be undefined in b. –  ErikE Jun 14 '11 at 20:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.