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Consider this interface:

public interface Listenable {
  void listen();
}

Consider this implementation:

public class Listener implements Listenable {
  public void listen() {
    System.out.println("I am listening");
  }
}

Now I am doing remoting via RMI and I am passing instances of such classes to server (maybe some black-magic proxies are spawn there, not sure).

The only solution I was able to invent so far, and I have to say it's pretty idiotic, is to add this code to Listener class:

public class Listener implements Listenable {
  private double id;
  private Random rand = new Random();
  public Listener() {
    this.id = rand.nextDouble();
  }
  public void listen() {
    System.out.println("I am listening");
  }
  public int hashCode() { ... } // calculate from id
  // same for equals - compare by id
}

This usually works, but we all know how evil this is :/ How should one deal with such a situation?

UPDATE:

Stanard equals did not work for me, because instances are over different VMs (I mentioned remoting), so it couldn't work. I will need some state variable after all, or suggest something good for comparing such classes on remote VMs. I am very sorry for confusion.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you override hashCode? – khachik Jun 14 '11 at 19:36
    
If they don't have any meaningful state why are you trying to make an equals() method at all? This built-in can test for identity. – ArtB Jun 14 '11 at 19:37
    
@Khackik if you override hashcode() you must override equals, thats part of the contract. – ArtB Jun 14 '11 at 19:37
    
@ArtB, yes, but not backwards - you don't need to override hashcode to override equals. So it was a good question. – dantuch Jun 14 '11 at 19:42
    
even if you use this way, don't use this.id == other.id.. it is a double, and thus the accuracy is not guaranteed... :\ – amit Jun 14 '11 at 19:44
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Make the listener an enum singleton:

public enum Listener implements Listenable {
  INSTANCE;

  public void listen() {
    System.out.println("I am listening");
  }
}

Then there will be only one instance of Listener and equality is guaranteed.

You may not want to expose the fact that you're using an enum for this or even that the listener is a singleton at all. What you can do is make the enum a private inner enum of some class with static methods (called Listenables, let's say) and just expose this implementation through a static method:

public static Listenable printingListenable() {
  return Listener.INSTANCE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even over different VMs? – Xorty Jun 14 '11 at 19:51
    
@Xorty: Yes. If you serialize Listener.INSTANCE on one machine and deserialize it on another, it will deserialize to the single instance of itself. Enums guarantee this for you. – ColinD Jun 14 '11 at 19:53
    
Let me try this, brb :) – Xorty Jun 14 '11 at 19:54
    
@CollinD I am impressed. That work perfectly well! Do you have idea if that would work when interacting JRockit with HotSpot? I am afraid this won't ... – Xorty Jun 14 '11 at 20:16
    
@Xorty: Should work fine. Enums are serialized by class name and constant name only, so when you serialize com.foo.Listener.INSTANCE it'll deserialize to the same thing on the other side (using the static method Enum.valueOf). It's not something VM specific. – ColinD Jun 14 '11 at 20:27

IMHO equality of objects is defined by the equality of their state. If the object does not hold any state (arguably it shouldn't be called an object, but that's a different story), all the instances of that object are logically equal. So don't bother and write:

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
  return obj instanceof Listener;
}

public int hashCode() {
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Since listener is completely stateless, for many practical purposes different instances may be considered to be the same identity. In a nutshell, the class itself will determine identity. So how about this:

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
   return obj!=null&&obj.getClass().equals(this.getClass());
 }

 public int hashCode() {
   return 0;
 }
}

I have a concern about instanceof as subclasses may not be considered the same object.

share|improve this answer

If the objects dont have any state, then they all should be equal. Why the need to differentiate between them?

share|improve this answer

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