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I've put these together with the help of others and several resources. I've made a fiddle of everything, and the stripped down code is posted below.

Basically I've learned how to use each of these patterns but I'm curious about the more fundamental differences between these approaches. Downstream code is practically identical with any of these patterns, but is there a reason why one should use one over another, beyond personal preference? Also though I've tried to gather up the most common patterns, please suggest your own if it's better.

Pattern 1 (Object Based):

var mouseDiff = {
    "startPoint" : {"x" :0, "y" : 0},
    "hypotenuse" : function(a,b) {
        // do something
    },
    "init"       : function(){
        // do something
    }
}

mouseDiff.init();

Pattern 2 (Most traditional as far as I know):

function MouseDiff() {
    this.startPoint = {"x" :0, "y" : 0};
}

MouseDiff.prototype.hypotenuse = function(a,b) {
    // do something
}

MouseDiff.prototype.init = function() {
    // do something
}

var myMouse = new MouseDiff;
myMouse.init();

Pattern 3 (Making use of closure):

var MouseDiff2 = (function() {
    var startPoint = {"x" :0, "y" : 0};
    var hypotenuse = function(a,b) {
        // do something
    };
    return {
        hypotenuse: hypotenuse,
        init : function(){
            // do something
        }
    };

}());
MouseDiff2.init();
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2  
Pattern 4 : Object.create. Because that's how you do prototypical OO. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 19:44
2  
To elaborate on @Raynos's comment, Object.create is most often used in conjunction with Pattern 1. Calling var mouseDiff2 = Object.create(mouseDiff) gives you a new, separate, object, with a reference stored in mouseDiff2. You can then use it however you want, without the original object being affected. –  Ryan Kinal Jun 14 '11 at 20:01
1  
@RyanKinal that's not completely true. You can edit the original object. It's also important to note that mouseDiff is placed in the prototype chain of mouseDiff2 –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:03
    
@Raynos Oh, wow. Yeah, that was my bad. Head's a little unclear today. Object.create gives you a new object that inherits from the old object, via the prototype chain. –  Ryan Kinal Jun 14 '11 at 20:10
    
To clarify. var o1 = { "foo": { "bar": "baz" } }; var o2 = Object.create(o1); o2.foo.bar = 42; console.log(o1.foo.bar); Is an example of the "cloned" object corrupting state on the original. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Pattern 1 is a singleton. If you only need one such object, it's just fine.

Pattern 2 builds new objects, and takes advantage of the prototype object so that when a new MouseDiff object is created, it will not create new copies of the functions (which are themselves data in JavaScript).

Pattern 3 requires more memory in comparison to a regular singleton but it offers static privacy.

I like the following pattern, as it covers various features, though it is really a combination of the constructor (pattern 2) and closure (pattern 3):

var MouseDiff = (function () {

    var aStaticVariable = 'Woohoo!';
    // And if you really need 100% truly private instance
    // variables which are not methods and which can be
    // shared between methods (and don't mind the rather
    // big hassle they require), see
    // http://brettz9.blogspot.com/search?q=relator
    // (see also the new plans for a Map/WeakMap in ECMAScript)

    function _APrivateStaticMethod () {
        alert(aStaticVariable);
    }

    // An instance method meant to be called on the
    //   particular object as via ".call(this)" below
    function _APrivateInstanceMethod () {
        alert(this.startPoint.x);
    }

    // Begin Constructor
    function MouseDiff() {
        this.startPoint = {"x" :0, "y" : 0};
    }

    MouseDiff.prototype.hypotenuse = function(a,b) {
        // do something
    };

    MouseDiff.prototype.init = function() {
        // do something
        _APrivateStaticMethod(); // alerts 'Woohoo!'
        _APrivateInstanceMethod.call(this); // alerts 0 (but if not
        // called with this, _APrivateInstanceMethod's internal
        // "this" will refer (potentially dangerously) to the
        // global object, as in the window in the browser unless
        // this class was defined within 'strict' mode in which
        // case "this" would be undefined)
    };

    return MouseDiff;
}());

var myMouse = new MouseDiff;
myMouse.init();
share|improve this answer
    
Pedantry states that singleton is a silly term to use in a language like JavaScript because the concept is wedded with classes which don't exist in JS. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:05
    
Sure. But practically speaking, since we learn by relating things to what we know, I think it is still helpful to describe it this way, and think of the new keyword making functions usable as "classes". –  Brett Zamir Jun 14 '11 at 20:17
    
Singleton is still the wrong word. It's a way to have only one object that matches a particular interface (defined by a class in say C#/Java). You can't do that in JS because you can just create another one breaking the singleton concept. I appreciate it's helpful to use common terminology but Singleton is abused in this case (Don't worry, everyone does it.) –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:21
    
What's the practical difference though? One might think of it this way: Each object literal you use is generating an anonymous class and it is following its own interface. So the "other object" u can create afterward is conceptually just creating a different class and instance. –  Brett Zamir Jun 14 '11 at 20:47
    
I think in conceptual interfaces a la duck typing. If it has .quack and .swim then it's a Duck. So both implement the same conceptual interface (the one your document). The fact that there might be to instances of the Interface object is irrelevant. Like I said it's pedantry. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:49

I do not know enough about JavaScript to tell you what if any performance differences exist between these approaches. Here are just two differences between these I noticed. I'm sure there are others.

Pattern 1 creates one object with those properties, including attached methods. Pattern 2 allows us to easily create many objects with the same methods attached, without rewriting them.

Pattern 3 is like a factory. Instead of relying on prototype to automatically attach these methods, the factory just creates them anew and returns the object. The usage of a closure allows us to hide the "member variables" of the object. There is no way to access startPoint or hypotenuse() except through the "public" interface returned.

Whenever I answer these types of theoretical JavaScript questions, I always fear there is some technical detail I am forgetting or overlooking. If so, let me know, and I will fix the answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Pattern 3 could have been a factory, but since it immediately invokes, it is not. –  Brett Zamir Jun 14 '11 at 20:00
    
Yep, you're right. I missed the invocation. –  TNi Jun 14 '11 at 20:25

Pattern two is my personally preference because it is the closest to traditional object oriented programming and allows for easy inheritance.

This post by John Resig (the guy behind JQuery) uses that method... http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/

[edit]

In fact, I don't think methods 1 or 3 have any benefits. 1 is, as someone else said, a singleton and does not allow multiple instances and 3... I don't know where to start with 3.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that both are immediatly invoked to create an object rather then presented in their generic form. method 1 and 3 actually have valid advantages over method 2 in their generic factory format. –  Raynos Jun 14 '11 at 20:06
    
The benefit of pattern 1 is convenience, the benefit of pattern 3 is static (and with a lot of extra work) instance privacy. –  Brett Zamir Jun 14 '11 at 20:19
    
I just noticed that about #3. The private variable thing is very interesting. I still don't think that losing the ability to use instanceof and inheritance. #1 and #3 are a more like namespaces than objects. –  Andrew Curioso Jun 14 '11 at 20:52

There is one more possible way to do this.

var MouseDiff = {};
(function(context) { 
    var privateVarialble = 0;

    context.hypotenuse = function() {
         //code here    
    };

    context.int = function() {
      //code here    
    }
})(MouseDiff); 

Here we simply pass the namespace as an argument to a self-invoking function. The privateVarialble variable is private because it does not get assigned to the context.

We can even set the context to the global object (with a one word change!). Inside brackets (MouseDiff) make it (this). This is a big asset for library vendors – who can wrap their features in a self-invoking function and leave it to the user to decide whether they should be global or not.

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http://www.jsoops.net/ is quite good for oop in Js. If provide private, protected, public variable and function, and also Inheritance feature. Example Code:

var ClassA = JsOops(function (pri, pro, pub)
{// pri = private, pro = protected, pub = public

    pri.className = "I am A ";

    this.init = function (var1)// constructor
    {
        pri.className += var1;
    }

    pub.getData = function ()
    {
        return "ClassA(Top=" + pro.getClassName() + ", This=" + pri.getClassName()
        + ", ID=" + pro.getClassId() + ")";
    }

    pri.getClassName = function () { return pri.className; }
    pro.getClassName = function () { return pri.className; }
    pro.getClassId = function () { return 1; }
});

var newA = new ClassA("Class");

//***Access public function
console.log(typeof (newA.getData));
// function
console.log(newA.getData());
// ClassA(Top=I am A Class, This=I am A Class, ID=1)

//***You can not access constructor, private and protected function
console.log(typeof (newA.init));            // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.className));       // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.pro));             // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.getClassName));    // undefined
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This has been answered elsewhere many times before but just to offer up some variety. ds.oop is a nice way to declare classes with constructors in javascript. It supports every possible type of inheritance (Including 1 type that even c# does not support) as well as Interfaces which is nice.

var Color = ds.make.class({
    type: 'Color',
    constructor: function (r,g,b) { 
        this.r = r;                     /* now r,g, and b are available to   */
        this.g = g;                     /* other methods in the Color class  */
        this.b = b;                     
    }
});
var red = new Color(255,0,0);   // using the new keyword to instantiate the class
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