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I'm working on a large scale project in which I'm designing a sparse matrix vector application but I'm still working to understand the code. I'm beginning by building the foundation for the application but I've run into a segmentation fault when executing the program. I've tracked the problem to this loop within the MatrixRead function and am enclosing the code below. When the program is executed I tried programming in some test messages and the program appears to execute all the loops but it returns the segmentation fault at the end. Of course, this is all just speculation. Any help would be awesome. Thanks!

    while (ret != EOF && row <= mat->rows) 
       {    
          if (row != curr_row) // Won't execute for first iteration
              {

                  /* store this row */

                 MatrixSetRow(mat, curr_row, len, ind, val);

                     /* check if the previous row is zero  */

                     i = 1;
                     while(row != curr_row + i)
                     { 
                         mat->lens[curr_row+i-1] = 0;
                         mat->inds[curr_row+i-1] = 0;
                         mat->vals[curr_row+i-1] = 0;  
                         i++;
                     }
                     curr_row = row;

                     /* reset row pointer */

                     len = 0;
               }

         ind[len] = col;
         val[len] = value;
         len++;

         ret = fscanf(file, "%lf %lf %lf", &r1, &c1, &value);

         col = (int) (c1);
         row = (int) (r1);
      }

/* Store the final row */
    if (ret == EOF || row > mat->rows)
    MatrixSetRow(mat, mat->rows, len, ind, val);

Here's the code for the MatrixSetRow function:

    /*--------------------------------------------------------------------------
     * MatrixSetRow - Set a row in a matrix.  Only local rows can be set.
     * Once a row has been set, it should not be set again, or else the 
     * memory used by the existing row will not be recovered until 
     * the matrix is destroyed.  "row" is in global coordinate numbering.
     *--------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

    void MatrixSetRow(Matrix *mat, int row, int len, int *ind, double *val)
    {
        row -= 1;

        mat->lens[row] = len;
        mat->inds[row] = (int *) MemAlloc(mat->mem, len*sizeof(int));
        mat->vals[row] = (double *) MemAlloc(mat->mem, len*sizeof(double));

        if (ind != NULL)
            memcpy(mat->inds[row], ind, len*sizeof(int));

        if (val != NULL)
            memcpy(mat->vals[row], val, len*sizeof(double));
    }

I'm also including the code for the Matrix.h file that went with it, where the members of Matrix are defined:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include "Common.h"
    #include "Mem.h"

    #ifndef _MATRIX_H
    #define _MATRIX_H

    typedef struct
    {

        int      rows;
        int      columns;

        Mem     *mem;

        int     *lens;
        int    **inds;
        double **vals;

    }
    Matrix;
share|improve this question
    
Show us how mat->lens is declared; show us MatrixSetRow –  cnicutar Jun 14 '11 at 20:02
    
I've added the MatrixSetRow function at the end of the original post. Thanks! –  Strata Jun 14 '11 at 20:18
    
What does "at the end" mean? At the end of the last iteration or the code? –  Adam Jun 15 '11 at 1:16
    
Maybe you should run the program in a real debugger to find the line that causes the segfault? And are the temporary ind and val arrays large enough? Looks reasonable otherwise. I hope your custom memory allocation works correctly? –  Christian Rau Sep 26 '11 at 20:35
    
It also seems like you read 1-based row and column indices, as you decrement the read row index. But you don't decrement the read column indices and I don't know if this is intended. But this shouldn't cause your segfault, anyway. –  Christian Rau Sep 26 '11 at 20:42

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