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I'm using the following (based on this) to create an embedded Tomcat server:

File catalinaHome = new File(".");
File webAppDir = new File("web");

Embedded server = new Embedded();
server.setCatalinaHome(catalinaHome.getAbsolutePath());

Context rootContext = server.createContext("", webAppDir.getAbsolutePath());
rootContext.setParentClassLoader(Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader());

Host localHost = server.createHost("localhost", webAppDir.getAbsolutePath());
localHost.addChild(rootContext);

Engine engine = server.createEngine();
engine.setName("localEngine");
engine.addChild(localHost);
engine.setDefaultHost(localHost.getName());
server.addEngine(engine);

Connector http = server.createConnector((InetAddress) null, 8080, false);
server.addConnector(http);

server.setAwait(true);
server.start();

The web directory has static content (index.html, etc.) as well as a WEB-INF directory with servlet descriptors like web.xml. This is starting without exception and the servlets defined in web.xml work, but static content like index.html aren't working.

I'm confused: what am I missing to get the static content handled?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need to define the default servlet. It's the one responsible for serving static content. This can be done by either explicitly declaring it in your webapp's /WEB-INF/web.xml the same way as Tomcat's own regular /conf/web.xml is doing, or in the following declarative manner for embedded Tomcat:

// Define DefaultServlet.
Wrapper defaultServlet = rootContext.createWrapper();
defaultServlet.setName("default");
defaultServlet.setServletClass("org.apache.catalina.servlets.DefaultServlet");
defaultServlet.addInitParameter("debug", "0");
defaultServlet.addInitParameter("listings", "false");
defaultServlet.setLoadOnStartup(1);
rootContext.addChild(defaultServlet);
rootContext.addServletMapping("/", "default");

You'd probably also like to do the same for the JSP servlet so that you can also use JSPs:

// Define JspServlet.
Wrapper jspServlet = rootContext.createWrapper();
jspServlet.setName("jsp");
jspServlet.setServletClass("org.apache.jasper.servlet.JspServlet");
jspServlet.addInitParameter("fork", "false");
jspServlet.addInitParameter("xpoweredBy", "false");
jspServlet.setLoadOnStartup(2);
rootContext.addChild(jspServlet);
rootContext.addServletMapping("*.jsp", "jsp");
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That did it, thanks! –  Alan Krueger Jun 15 '11 at 4:12
    
thank you very much! this answer helped me a lot. –  Chris Feb 6 '14 at 12:29

Instead of configuring the wrappers like BalusC showed, you can also use this one-liner which does (almost) exactly the same:

Tomcat.initWebappDefaults(rootContext);

Add this line somewhere before you start your server. Tested with JDK1.7 and Tomcat 7.0.50.

Note: It additionally adds welcome files and some MIME Type mappings. The method looks like following:

public static void initWebappDefaults(Context ctx) {
        // Default servlet 
        Wrapper servlet = addServlet(
                ctx, "default", "org.apache.catalina.servlets.DefaultServlet");
        servlet.setLoadOnStartup(1);
        servlet.setOverridable(true);

        // JSP servlet (by class name - to avoid loading all deps)
        servlet = addServlet(
                ctx, "jsp", "org.apache.jasper.servlet.JspServlet");
        servlet.addInitParameter("fork", "false");
        servlet.setLoadOnStartup(3);
        servlet.setOverridable(true);

        // Servlet mappings
        ctx.addServletMapping("/", "default");
        ctx.addServletMapping("*.jsp", "jsp");
        ctx.addServletMapping("*.jspx", "jsp");

        // Sessions
        ctx.setSessionTimeout(30);

        // MIME mappings
        for (int i = 0; i < DEFAULT_MIME_MAPPINGS.length;) {
            ctx.addMimeMapping(DEFAULT_MIME_MAPPINGS[i++],
                    DEFAULT_MIME_MAPPINGS[i++]);
        }

        // Welcome files
        ctx.addWelcomeFile("index.html");
        ctx.addWelcomeFile("index.htm");
        ctx.addWelcomeFile("index.jsp");
    }
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