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I saw this question, but the answers there are not very relevant. A friend needs a bank of solved recursion problems to help him study for a test tomorrow.

He learned the issue theoretically, but is having problems grasping how to actually solve recursion problems. Do you know a good source of solved recursion problems (preferably in C, but can be in a C-style language as well) available on the net?

Note - examples in functional languages will not help much here. My friend is in a study race to pass his test tomorrow, and I'm sure switching languages will just confuse him at this point (it might be educational on other, less stressed times).

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Dammit, I was going to make the recursive recursion joke, but I see it's the first answer to the linked thread. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 11 '09 at 15:11
    
There's an old saying, "In order to understand recursion, it helps to understand recursion." –  David Thornley Mar 11 '09 at 15:24
    
The programming language syntax is independent from understanding recursion itself. Please consider functional languages. –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 11 '09 at 17:48
    
Personally I have no problems with functional languages. Because this is for a friend, who is not a CS major, I was trying to simplify things. It's enough he has psychological fears of recursion, no need to scare him with LISP. –  ripper234 Mar 11 '09 at 22:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This article explains recursion and has some simple C examples for traversing linked list and binary tree

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One of the best ways to learn recursion is to get some experience in a functional programming language such as Haskell or Lisp or Scheme.

So finding recursive problems can be reduced to finding some problems and answers related to functional programming languages. Here's an example 99 lisp problems.

It really only takes 5 minutes to learn Scheme or Lisp so you can get started with examples right away for the test tomorrow you mentioned.

Another great way to learn recursion is to get some practice in mathematical proofs involving induction.


Key concepts relating to recursion:

With recursion you don't need to know how to solve the problem. You just need to know 2 things. 1) how to solve the smallest instance of the problem, and 2) how to break it up into smaller parts.

Equivalently, you just have to keep in mind that you need: 1) a base case and 2) a recursive case.

The base case handles 1 single instance of what you want to do with smallest input.

The recursive case breaks the problem into a subproblem. Eventually this subproblem will reduce to the base case.

Example:

//1+...+n = n*n(+1)/2 = sumAll(n):

int sumAll(int x)
{
  if(x == 0) //base case
    return 0; 
  else
    return sumAll(x-1) + x; //recursive case
}

It is important to understand that the base case is not hard to figure out. It just has to exist. Here is an equivalent solution for x> 0:

//1+...+n = n*n(+1)/2 = sumAll(n):
int sumAll(int x)
{
  if(x == 1) //base case
    return 1; 
  else
    return sumAll(x-1) + x; //recursive case
}
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Something like Common Lisp is overkill. Scheme will work very nicely. –  David Thornley Mar 11 '09 at 15:24

This is going to sound like a very lame answer, but recursion is a paradigm that's often very hard to grasp at the first for beginners. It will take more than a day's meditation on the subject for your friend to firmly grasp the concept.

You may want to have him peruse Project Euler for a potential direction to study.

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1  
<pedant>One day is probably not nearly enough time to study an entire website carefully.</pedant> –  Michael Myers Mar 11 '09 at 15:38
    
Amen to that sir! –  Boydski Mar 11 '09 at 17:27
2  
I don't think it does anyone any favours, all this "get ready to blow your mind: here comes recursion" stuff. It's not that hard, but scaring people makes it harder for them. –  slim Mar 12 '09 at 9:33
    
Point taken. And very true that sir. I was attempting (maybe lamely so) to be eloquent in my wording to let ripper234 know that 1/2 day and 1 night wasn't enough for his friend to grasp the concept if he hasn't already in his studies, which was implied by the question. –  Boydski Mar 12 '09 at 19:59

I think Haskell's syntax is great for thinking recursively, because the pattern matching construct makes the base case and the recursive case so obvious. Translating this into another language is then fairly straightforward.

sumAll [] = 0
sumAll (x:xs) = x + sumAll xs

To understand this, you really only need to know that

  • [] represents an empty list,
  • (x:xs) splits a list into a head (x) and a tail (xs)

You don't need to learn all of Haskell (which is, let's face it, hard) - but doing some of the basics certainly helps you think in recursion.

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In c /c++ language a function can call itself and this case is called Recursion. Mainly recursion have two cases:

  1. Base case.
  2. recursive case.

and we have some recursive categories like as...

  1. Liner recursion
  2. Binary recursion
  3. Nested recursion
  4. Mutual recursion
  5. Tail recursion

Here take a example to discuss recursion ...

// a recursive program to calculate NcR  //
#include <stdio.h> 
int ncr(int x,int y)
{
    if(y>x)
    {
        printf("!sorry,the operation can't processed.");
        getch();
        exit(1);
    }
    else if(y==0 ||y==x)   //base case
    {
        return(1);
    }
    else
    {
        return(ncr(x-1,y-1)+ncr(x-1,y));  //recursive case
    }
}
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Read SICP(Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs)

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#include<iostream>
using namesspace std;
int E(int x);
int main()
{
    int x;
    cout << E(x) << endl;
    return 0;
}

int E(int x)
{
    return x ? (x % 10 + E(x/10)) : 0;
}
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