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OK, this fails:

public class MyLoginBean extends org.apache.struts.action.ActionForm {

    private String[] roles;

    public MyLoginBean() {
        this.roles  = {"User"};
    }
}

This works:

public class MyLoginBean extends org.apache.struts.action.ActionForm {

    private String[] roles;

    public MyLoginBean() {
        String[] blah  = {"User"};
    }
}

Any information would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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It fails how? Stack trace? –  mdm Jun 14 '11 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Try

public class MyLoginBean extends org.apache.struts.action.ActionForm {

    private String[] roles;

    public MyLoginBean() {
        this.roles  = new String[]{"User"};
    }
}

the array initializer of type String[] foo = {"bar1", "bar2"}; can be used if only you have the declaration and initialization together. If you seperate the initialization from declaration, you cannot do {...}; you'll have to new String[]{...}

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+1. Thanks. I accepted this because it made the most sense and you set the roles inside a constructor or method...which I prefer. Thanks everyone for educating me in Java –  cbmeeks Jun 14 '11 at 20:39
    
I follow your answers. Great job. Do you blog? Please share the url if you do. Thanks. –  Sandeep Jun 15 '11 at 2:23

Array initializers (the bit in braces) are only available at the point where you're declaring an array variable, or as part of an array creation expression of the form new ElementType[] initializer.

So this is fine:

// Variable declaration
String[] x = { "Blah" };

This isn't, because you have neither a declaration nor an array creation expression:

x = { "Blah" };

but this is fine again, as it's got an array creation expression:

x = new String[] { "Blah" };

The links above are to the relevant bits of the language specification.

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+1 for siting references. –  cbmeeks Jun 14 '11 at 20:37

You need to put is as :

private String [] roles  = {"User"};  // Only allowed at the time of declaration.
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+1 but I prefer not to set objects outside of constructors or methods. –  cbmeeks Jun 14 '11 at 20:38

roles array does not have memory allocated by simply declaring it.

private String[] roles = new String[1]; // if you know only one element

public MyLoginBean() {
String[] blah = {"User"};

or

private String[] roles;

public MyLoginBean() {
String[] blah = new String[] {"User"};

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