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I'm using the following Ant apply task to run php lint over a set of PHP source files.

<apply executable="php" failonerror="true">
    <arg value="-l" />
    <filelist refid="server.lib" />
    <filelist refid="server.scripts" />
    <fileset refid="client.lib" />
    <fileset refid="shared.lib" />
</apply>

Based on Ant's output, it takes around 30 seconds.

The same task performed by Make is almost instantaneous.

Is there a way to speed up the ant task?

EDIT

I've tried adding spawn="true" to the apply section and it sped up dramatically. Aside from the loss of logging, is this a good solution?

EDIT 2

spawn=true doesn't play nice with 'failonerror=true' so spawn won't work.

EDIT 3

To answer Hakre's question in the comments, the filesets cover 66 files all together. I can paste the ant output if that would help.

EDIT 4

Would it be possible to write this same task as an exec task instead?

share|improve this question
    
if you need no logging or input, output, error, and result property you could use spawn=true –  Rebse Jun 14 '11 at 20:49
    
@Rebse: I actually need the php lint to fail if there's a bad file so 'failonerror=true' prevents spawn from working. :( –  afrosteve Jun 14 '11 at 20:51
    
Can you roughly say about how many files the sets will stretch? –  hakre Jun 15 '11 at 9:57
    
exec and iterating over your filesets is similar to using apply - without parallel=true, means one call to php - l for every file. The suggestion of jnrg sounds good, only tackling the new files, leaving the known ones aside - not 66 + files.. –  Rebse Jun 16 '11 at 22:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming it's a CI related job, you can apply your lint on modified files :

<fileset  dir="." includes="**/*.php">
  <modified />
</fileset>

if your code base is huge, it would be surprising you modify many files at once (per commit).

You can also take the problem the other way around and prevent commits altogether if the script is not valid (pre-commit hooks, etc)

share|improve this answer
    
The modified ended up being the better option. –  afrosteve Jul 22 '11 at 19:53
  1. try to set the parallel atttribute to true, see Ant Manual
  2. try to run Ant with JVM in server mode, set VM parameter "-server" via ANT_OPTS

EDIT
my attempt would have been something like =

<patternset id="php.sources">
    <include name="**/*.php"/>
</patternset>

<apply executable="php" failonerror="true" error="phperr.check" parallel="true">
    <arg value="-l" />
    <fileset dir="lib">
        <patternset refid="php.sources" />
    </fileset>
    <fileset dir="scripts">
        <patternset refid="php.sources" />
    </fileset>
    <fileset dir="client">
        <patternset refid="php.sources" />
    </fileset>
    <fileset dir="shared">
        <patternset refid="php.sources" />
    </fileset>
    <fileset dir="tests">
        <patternset refid="php.sources" />
    </fileset>
</apply>

what errormessage do you get when using parallel="true" ?

share|improve this answer
    
You mean try parallel="true" I think? –  martin clayton Jun 14 '11 at 20:49
    
thanks for the hint Martin ! of course i meant parallel=true as parallel=false is default –  Rebse Jun 14 '11 at 20:52
    
php -l will only take one file as an argument, so parallel doesn't work. '-server', assuming I set it correctly, made no change. –  afrosteve Jun 14 '11 at 21:03
    
No error, it just runs php -l on the first file it gets and then goes to the next task. I'll try your example and see what happens. –  afrosteve Jun 14 '11 at 22:27
    
Same result. Parallel is equivalent to just doing 'php -l file1 file2 file3', except php -l only takes the first file, so file2 and file3 are discarded. –  afrosteve Jun 15 '11 at 16:57

The parallelization of tasks can be achieved at a higher level:

<target name="phplint">

    <parallel threadcount="2">
        <apply executable="php" failonerror="true">
            <arg value="-l" />
            <fileset dir="${basedir}">
                <include name="**/Dir1/**.php" />
            </fileset>
        </apply>

        <apply executable="php" failonerror="true">
            <arg value="-l" />
            <fileset dir="${basedir}">
                <include name="**/Dir2/**.php" />
            </fileset>
        </apply>
    </parallel>

</target>

As the task is I/O consuming, dividing it into more threads yields a good decrease in execution time.

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