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How can I run the same test against a lot of different data? I want to be reported of all failures.

For example:

def isEven(number):
    return True # quite buggy implementation

data = [ 
    (2, True), 
    (3, False), 
    (4, True),
    (5, False),
]

class MyTest:
   def evenTest(self, num, expected):
       self.assertEquals(expected, isEven(num))

I have found solution which raises error on first failure only: http://melp.nl/2011/02/phpunit-style-dataprovider-in-python-unit-test/

How to run test to be reported of all failures?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should be using py.test, i think unittest module was blindly copied from junit, anyway we can hack our way like this

import unittest

data = [ 
    (2, True), 
    (3, False), 
    (4, True),
    (5, False)]

# this should be imported from a separate module.
def isEven(number):
    return True # quite buggy implementation

def create_test_func(num, expected):
    def _test_func(self):
        self.assertEqual(expected, isEven(num))
    return _test_func

class TestIsEven(unittest.TestCase):

    pass

# pyunit isn't pythonic enought use py.test instead
# till then we rely on such hackery
import new
for i, (num, expected) in enumerate(data):
    setattr(TestIsEven, 'test_data_%d'%i, create_test_func(num, expected))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    unittest.main()

and output is:

.F.F
======================================================================
FAIL: test_data_1 (__main__.TestIsEven)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "untitled-1.py", line 15, in _test_func
    self.assertEqual(expected, isEven(num))
AssertionError: False != True

======================================================================
FAIL: test_data_3 (__main__.TestIsEven)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "untitled-1.py", line 15, in _test_func
    self.assertEqual(expected, isEven(num))
AssertionError: False != True

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 4 tests in 0.000s

FAILED (failures=2)

Using this approach you can add more niceties like printing debug info on failure etc

share|improve this answer
    
+1, on i think unittest module was blindly copied from junit and it's not the only one that was copied from java-like :) –  mouad Jun 15 '11 at 7:13

One solution is to make different test case instances for each entry in data:

class MyTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def __init__(self, num, expected):
        unittest.TestCase.__init__(self, "evenTest")
        self.num = num
        self.expected = expected
    def evenTest(self):
        self.assertEqual(self.expected, isEven(self.num))

For unittest to know how to construct the test cases, add a load_tests() function to your module:

def load_tests(loader, tests, pattern):
    return unittest.TestSuite(MyTest(num, expected)
                              for num, expected in data)
share|improve this answer

Are you looking for something like this:

import unittest


def is_even(number):
    return True # quite buggy implementation


class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        self.expected_output = [
            (2, True),
            (3, False),
            (4, True),
            (5, False)
        ]

    def test_is_even(self):
        real_res = []

        for arg, _ in self.expected_output:
            real_res.append((arg, is_even(arg)))

        msg_error = '\nFor %s Expected %s Got %s'
        msg = []
        for res1, res2 in zip(real_res, self.expected_output):
            if res1[1] != res2[1]:
                msg.append(msg_error % (res1[0], res1[1], res2[1]))


        self.assertEqual(real_res, self.expected_output, "".join(msg))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Output:

F
======================================================================
FAIL: test_is_even (__main__.TestCase)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 29, in test_example
    self.assertEqual(real_res, self.expected_output, ''.join(msg))
AssertionError: 
For 3 Expected True Got False
For 5 Expected True Got False

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.000s

FAILED (failures=1)
share|improve this answer
    
If I had 50 tests, from which 10 fails it will be difficult to find what's going on. For small set of simple test data, it will be very handy and useful. Thanks :) –  jinowolski Jun 14 '11 at 22:08
2  
@jinowolski: That true, gladly we can customize the error msg as much as we want i edited my answer i don't know if this work for you. –  mouad Jun 14 '11 at 22:21
    
but it is still 1 test –  Anurag Uniyal Jun 14 '11 at 23:17
2  
@Anurag: Which is IMO what it should be, one (simple) function one test, and even if we want to split the tests at least they should all figure out in one Test Case, i can't imagine splitting this in more that one test case specially if this is just a part of a big package, but this is just my humble opinion :) –  mouad Jun 15 '11 at 7:09

I have also found Adrian Panasiuk approach, from this answer:

Python's unittest and dynamic creation of test cases

With this solution it is possible to set different test names according to data.

share|improve this answer

If you are using pytest you can go this way:

import pytest                                                                                                                   

def is_even(number):
    return True # quite buggy implementation

@pytest.mark.parametrize("number, expected", [
    (2, True),
    (3, False),
    (4, True),
    (5, False)
])
def test_is_even(number, expected):
    assert is_even(number) == expected

You will get something like (shortened):

/tmp/test_it.py:13: AssertionError
=========== 2 failed, 2 passed in 0.01 seconds ====================
share|improve this answer
import unittest

data = [ 
    (2, True), 
    (3, False), 
    (4, True),
    (5, False)]

# this should be imported from a separate module.
def isEven(number):
    return True # quite buggy implementation


class TestIsEven(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_is_even(self):
        for num, expected in data:
            self.assertEqual(expected, isEven(num))
share|improve this answer
    
This raises on the first error -- read the end of the question again. –  Sven Marnach Jun 14 '11 at 21:31

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