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I am developing unit tests that can benefit from a lot from reusability when it comes to creation of test data. However, there are different things (API calls) I need to do with the same test data (API args).

I am wondering if the following idiom is possible in Java.

Class RunTestScenarios {

void runScenarioOne (A a, B b, C c) {
   ........
}

void runScenarioTwo (A a, B b, C c) {
   ........
}

void runScenario (/* The scenario */  scenarioXXX) {
     A a = createTestDataA();
     B b = createTestDataB();
     C c = createTestDataC();
     scenarioXXX(a, b, c);
}

public static void main (String[] args) {
    runScenario(runScenarioOne);
    runScenario(runScenarioTwo);
}

}

Essentially, I dont want to have something like the following repeated everywhere:

 A a = createTestDataA();
 B b = createTestDataB();
 C c = createTestDataC();

To my knowledge such aliasing (scenarioXXX) is not possible but I will be happy to be corrected or if anyone can suggest possible design alternatives to accomplish this effect.

Btw, I am aware of Command Pattern to get this done. But not what I am looking for.

Thanks, US

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4 Answers 4

One way you can achieve this is by using intefaces:-

  1. Modify the runScenario() method to accept that interface as an argument.
  2. Implement the inteface for each scenario types and pass the one that you need for the scenario testing.

Generally unit testing in java is done by using jUnit if you already did not know about it. There are many tutorials available and one such can be found here.

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  1. Use jUnit.
  2. Convert a,b & c to fields.
  3. Use jUnit's setUp and tearDown methods to initialise fresh objects for each test.
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No, you cannot do that in Java. Not without lambda support (don't hold your breath...). You can do that in Scala, for example using ScalaTest. And probably in some other JVM languages.
In Java, the idiom is to wrap these functions with anonymous classes, perhaps implementing an interface defining the method to run.

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Thanks. While not a solution, but I think you did a better job of describing the problem itself - lambda support. Java does not have concept of Method reference or function type (yet). I was wondering if there is a more concise alternative without having to build lot of boiler-plate code - such as the standard alternatives you suggested (annonymous class/interface). Thanks much though. –  USQ Jun 14 '11 at 23:47
    
Well, anonymous classes are a solution... I just didn't give code as it is quite obvious. Java is verbose and likes boiler plate code... (or at least, it is hard to avoid it). The other solutions I see suggested, like using libraries (unit test frameworks) features, are good workarounds. –  PhiLho Jun 15 '11 at 5:53
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I'm not sure to quite get what you need, but it seems to me that you can use DataProvider that TestNG provides.

Is something like this:

...
@Test(dataProvider="someMethodWithDataProviderAnnotation") 
void runScenarioOne (A a, B b, C c) {
...
}

@Test(dataProvider="someMethodWithDataProviderAnnotation") 
void runScenarioTwo (A a, B b, C c) {
...
}

And then you craete your data provider:

@DataProvider(name="someMethodWithDataProviderAnnotation")
private Object [][] getTestData() {
   return new Object[]][] {{
         createTestDataA(),
         createTestDataB(),
         createTestDataC()
   }};
 } 

And that's it, when you run your test they will be invoked with the right parameters which will be creates only once. Although this is more useful when you have to load a lot of resources, for instance, all the files in a directory or something like that.

You just run all the methods in the class.

Read more here:

http://testng.org/doc/documentation-main.html#parameters-dataproviders

BTW: TestNG is included as plugin in Intellj IDEA

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+1: Not sure if this is what OP was looking for but it is an informative post and might very well be what OP is looking for. –  CoolBeans Jun 14 '11 at 22:49
    
Me neither :P I hope this helps anyway. :) –  OscarRyz Jun 14 '11 at 22:50
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