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I was wondering something like this is possible. Perhaps using templates and trickery? The only rule right now i'll enforce is you are NOT ALLOWED to use a constructor in the class bar (so you cannot pass in a reference or pointer to foo nor a).

class Foo{
    int a;
public:
    struct Bar{
        int barme(){ return a; }
    };
};

I know one problem is how does bar know what instance of foo to use? i dont know but i'd like a foo to have many classes of Bar and more then one foo which each will have more then one bar.

I'm sure i seen a trick somewhere (maybe in a different language) but i dont know where. I do remember a template using compile time const but foo wont be compile time in this case although its ptr/ref could be

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You are not allowed to use a constructor? Pray tell how does this object get created then? Did you know that the compiler will create a default constructor, destructor, copy constructor, and assignment operator if you don't provide one :P Also note this doesn't compile did you mean to have Bar inherit from Foo perhaps? – AJG85 Jun 14 '11 at 23:09
    
@AJG85: Right, i meant a non trivial/default ctor – acidzombie24 Jun 14 '11 at 23:10
    
@AJG85: It doesn't compile because of the access to a, which is the thing the OP is asking about. Inheritance is not always the solution; nested classes are often perfectly fine. (Though, in this case, it does seem like nested classes aren't what are needed.) – PreferenceBean Jun 14 '11 at 23:15
    
I think the best you can do is adding an Foo* referring to the parent as member and constructor parameter in Bar and make sure any reference to a from Bar goes through that reference (may need a friend statement too) – Laserallan Jun 14 '11 at 23:36
up vote 7 down vote accepted

In C++ nested classes are just classes. It's not like Java where a nested class comes with an instance of the parent class along for the ride. Therefore, nothing like this is possible. You have to pass an instance of Foo to operate on inside Bar. (For example std::vector::iterator does not come with a std::vector -- it's a completely independent type)

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can i magically pass one in through a template? i was hoping for something like that? so i can do Foo::Bar<int> v and have it do it all without me writing the_ctor:v(this){} to instantiate it. – acidzombie24 Jun 14 '11 at 23:13
    
@acid: No. Templates allow you to write type independent code, but the code still must be written. Really, if you're trying to do this, it seems like you're using nested classes for the wrong reasons. In C++, they're almost always a bad idea except in cases where the nested type is completely used to access the outer type (such as the standard containers and iterators). If you want something where the outer class comes along for the ride, use inheritance (probably Private inheritance) instead. – Billy ONeal Jun 14 '11 at 23:15
    
@acidzombie24: int is a type, not an object. – PreferenceBean Jun 14 '11 at 23:16
    
The idea was to auto magically pass in data the variable needs rather then do Foo::Bar<int> a,b,c,d; ctor: a(this), b(this)... which can get annoying. – acidzombie24 Jun 14 '11 at 23:33
    
@acid: We understand the idea. However, what you're trying to do simply does not work that way. – Billy ONeal Jun 14 '11 at 23:38

Ask a weird question, get a weird answer (this is meant to be humerus and not a dig at you):

class Foo{
    int a;
public:
    struct Bar{
        Foo* this_;
        int barme(){ return this_->a; }
    };
};

Look ma, no constructor!

Foo foo;
Foo::Bar bar = { &foo };
bar.barme();

you are NOT ALLOWED to use a constructor in the class bar (so you cannot pass in a reference or pointer to foo nor a).

But I just did! Or did you mean that I may not? Fine!

class Foo{
    int a;

public:
    static Foo* nothing_to_see_here;
    Foo()
    { nothing_to_see_here = this; }

    struct Bar{
        int barme(){ return nothing_to_see_here->a; }
    };
};

Look ma, no passing stuff!

Foo foo;
Foo::Bar bar;
bar.barme();

Or did you mean something akin to closures?

// C++0x up in this
#include <functional>

class Foo{
    int a;

public:
    std::function<int()>
    bar()
    { return [=] { return a; }; }
};

No passing stuff in constructor or trickery* of any kind, guaranteed**!

Foo foo;
auto me = foo.bar();
me();
share|improve this answer

In C++ nesting one class inside another only means the name is nested, not that instances are nested. In other words, if you have classes A and B like:

class A { 
    class B { 
        // whatever
    };
};

Then B being nested inside of A only affects the visibility of the names involved, not how instances of either can be/are created -- for example, you can create an A::B without necessarily creating an instance of A.

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