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I have a simple question about Backbone.js' get and set functions.

1) With the code below, how can I 'get' or 'set' obj1.myAttribute1 directly?

Another question:

2) In the Model, aside from the defaults object, where can/should I declare my model's other attributes, such that they can be accessed via Backbone's get and set methods?

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        obj1 : {
            "myAttribute1" : false,
            "myAttribute2" : true,
        }
    }
})

var MyView = Backbone.View.extend({
    myFunc: function(){
        console.log(this.model.get("obj1"));
        //returns the obj1 object
        //but how do I get obj1.myAttribute1 directly so that it returns false?
    }
});

I know I can do:

this.model.get("obj1").myAttribute1;

but is that good practice?

share|improve this question
1  
your model definition helped me, +1 for that – Yasser Sep 26 '13 at 12:03
3  
While it isn't an answer to the question: Whenever specifying an object (anything passed by reference) in defaults (obj1 in this case), that same object will be shared across all instances of the model. The current practice is to define defaults as a function that returns an object to be used as defaults. backbonejs.org/#Model-defaults (see the italicized note) – Jonathan F Feb 19 '14 at 20:54
1  
@JonathanF Comments aren't meant for answers so you never needed the declaration :) – T J Nov 26 '14 at 18:05
up vote 123 down vote accepted

While this.model.get("obj1").myAttribute1 is fine, it's a bit problematic because then you might be tempted to do the same type of thing for set, i.e.

this.model.get("obj1").myAttribute1 = true;

But if you do this, you won't get the benefits of Backbone models for myAttribute1, like change events or validation.

A better solution would be to never nest POJSOs ("plain old JavaScript objects") in your models, and instead nest custom model classes. So it would look something like this:

var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        myAttribute1: false,
        myAttribute2: true
    }
});

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function () {
        this.set("obj1", new Obj());
    }
});

Then the accessing code would be

var x = this.model.get("obj1").get("myAttribute1");

but more importantly the setting code would be

this.model.get("obj1").set({ myAttribute1: true });

which will fire appropriate change events and the like. Working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/g3U7j/

share|improve this answer
3  
thanks this is very clear. – fortuneRice Jun 15 '11 at 0:09
23  
To this answer, I would add the advisement that this solution teeters on widespread Law of Demeter violations. I would consider adding convenience methods that hide the navigation to the nested object. Basically, your callers don't need to know the model's internal structure; after all, it may change and the callers should be none the wiser. – Bill Eisenhauer Jun 15 '11 at 0:54
7  
Can't get this to work for me. Throws error: Uncaught TypeError: Object #<Object> has no method 'set' – wilsonpage Oct 14 '11 at 15:15
1  
@ChristianNunciato, pagewil, Benno: You seem to have missed the point of the post, which is to nest Backbone models inside Backbone models. Don't nest plain objects inside Backbone models. Working example here: jsfiddle.net/g3U7j – Domenic Jun 26 '12 at 13:23
2  
@tom that is correct. Backbone doesn't special-case for when properties of models are instances of Backbone.Model, and then start doing magical event bubbling. – Domenic Jan 2 '13 at 4:38

I created backbone-deep-model for this - just extend Backbone.DeepModel instead of Backbone.Model and you can then use paths to get/set nested model attributes. It maintains change events too.

model.bind('change:user.name.first', function(){...});
model.set({'user.name.first': 'Eric'});
model.get('user.name.first'); //Eric
share|improve this answer
15  
I like this approach, wonder why it wasn't included in Backbone be default... – Amir Dec 25 '11 at 17:54
    
Does this works on deep arrays as well ? – Debjit Aug 29 '13 at 10:58
1  
Yes it does, if you look at the API there is an example like //You can use index notation to fetch from arrays console.log(model.get('otherSpies.0.name')) //'Lana' – tawheed Nov 13 '13 at 13:30
    
Works great! But does line 2 in your example require a colon instead of a comma? – mariachi Feb 10 '14 at 23:56
    
Yes you're right, have updated the example – evilcelery Feb 13 '14 at 12:41

Domenic's solution will work however each new MyModel will point to the same instance of Obj. To avoid this, MyModel should look like:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
  initialize: function() {
     myDefaults = {
       obj1: new Obj()
     } 
     this.set(myDefaults);
  }
});

See c3rin's answer @ http://stackoverflow.com/a/6364480/1072653 for a full explanation.

share|improve this answer
1  
For future readers, my answer has been updated to incorporate the best of Rusty's answer. – Domenic Aug 15 '12 at 22:32
2  
Asker should flag this as the accepted answer. Domenic's is a great start, but this solves an issue with it. – Jon Raasch Nov 30 '12 at 20:03

I use this approach.

If you have a Backbone model like this:

var nestedAttrModel = new Backbone.Model({
    a: {b: 1, c: 2}
});

You can set the attribute "a.b" with:

var _a = _.omit(nestedAttrModel.get('a')); // from underscore.js
_a.b = 3;
nestedAttrModel.set('a', _a);

Now your model will have attributes like:

{a: {b: 3, c: 2}}

with the "change" event fired.

share|improve this answer
1  
Are you sure about this? this does not work for me. meta2= m.get('x'); meta2.id=110; m.set('x', meta2). This does not trigger any change event for me :( – HungryCoder Jun 12 '13 at 9:25
1  
I see it works when I clone the attribute like _.clone(m.get('x')). thanks – HungryCoder Jun 12 '13 at 9:26
    
Thanks @HungryCoder it worked for me too when cloned. Backbone must compare the object you are setting with the object you are getting at set time. So if you don't clone then the two objects, then the two objects being compared are exactly the same at set time. – Derek Dahmer Oct 24 '13 at 22:33

I had the same problem @pagewil and @Benno had with @Domenic's solution. My answer was to instead write a simple sub-class of Backbone.Model that fixes the problem.

// Special model implementation that allows you to easily nest Backbone models as properties.
Backbone.NestedModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    // Define Backbone models that are present in properties
    // Expected Format:
    // [{key: 'courses', model: Course}]
    models: [],

    set: function(key, value, options) {
        var attrs, attr, val;

        if (_.isObject(key) || key == null) {
            attrs = key;
            options = value;
        } else {
            attrs = {};
            attrs[key] = value;
        }

        _.each(this.models, function(item){
            if (_.isObject(attrs[item.key])) {
                attrs[item.key] = new item.model(attrs[item.key]);
            }
        },this);

        return Backbone.Model.prototype.set.call(this, attrs, options);
    }
});

var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        myAttribute1: false,
        myAttribute2: true
    }
});

var MyModel = Backbone.NestedModel.extend({
    defaults: {
        obj1: new Obj()
    },

    models: [{key: 'obj1', model: Obj}]
});

What NestedModel does for you is allow these to work (which is what happens when myModel gets set via JSON data):

var myModel = new MyModel();
myModel.set({ obj1: { myAttribute1: 'abc', myAttribute2: 'xyz' } });
myModel.set('obj1', { myAttribute1: 123, myAttribute2: 456 });

It would be easy to generate the models list automatically in initialize, but this solution was good enough for me.

share|improve this answer

Solution proposed by Domenic has some drawbacks. Say you want to listen to 'change' event. In that case 'initialize' method will not be fired and your custom value for attribute will be replaced with json object from server. In my project I faced with this problem. My solution to override 'set' method of Model:

set: function(key, val, options) {
    if (typeof key === 'object') {
        var attrs = key;
        attrs.content = new module.BaseItem(attrs.content || {});
        attrs.children = new module.MenuItems(attrs.children || []);
    }

    return Backbone.Model.prototype.set.call(this, key, val, options);
}, 
share|improve this answer

While in some cases using Backbone models instead of nested Object attributes makes sense as Domenic mentioned, in simpler cases you could create a setter function in the model:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        obj1 : {
            "myAttribute1" : false,
            "myAttribute2" : true,
        }
    },
    setObj1Attribute: function(name, value) {
        var obj1 = this.get('obj1');
        obj1[name] = value;
        this.set('obj1', obj1);
    }
})
share|improve this answer

If you interact with backend, which requires object with nesting structure. But with backbone more easy to work with linear structure.

backbone.linear can help you.

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