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I have a base class which looks something like this:

class Base
{
public:
  typedef std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr_t;
  typedef std::weak_ptr<Base> wptr_t;

  enum class Type { foo, bar, baz };

  Type x;
  // ...
};

I'd like those internal types to be public so that I can do stuff like Base::ptr_t my_ptr(new Base); and so on. But if I make a new class like this...

class Derived : public Base
{
  // ...
};

unfortunately, Derived::ptr_t is still a Base pointer. I'd like Derived to publicly inherit x from Base, but not inherit ptr_t,wptr_t, or Type. For example

Derived a;
a.x = Base::Type::foo; // this should work
a.x = Derived::Type::foo; // but I want this to fail

Is this possible, perhaps though some magic use of friend or virtual or something like that?

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Since you want to make the pointer type match the class type, I can't help thinking you should be using templates rather than inheritance. –  MatthewD Jun 15 '11 at 3:17
    
I do want the pointer type to match the class type, but I also want the base type to exist so that it can be used as a base type. It would be nice to have a template to automatically get the pointer typedefs right for the derived types, but I haven't thought of a neat way to achieve that with a template yet - so I'd be content to just disable them completely (which is basically what this question is about). –  karadoc Jun 15 '11 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

Simply override the type:

class Derived {
  typedef int Type;
};

It will not allow the use of Derived::Type (as it's private as well as typedefed)

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That's a good idea, but rather than writing it in every flavour of Derived class, what i might end up doing is something like this: class SafeBase : public Base { typedef void ptr_t; typedef void Type; // etc. then derive from SafeBase instead of from Base. –  karadoc Jun 15 '11 at 3:50
    
@karadoc, yes that is a good idea. My solution is just a way to achieve the goal. Now based on need you can use it. You can also think about protected inheritance (if you don't want to typedef). (e.g. class Derived : protected Base –  iammilind Jun 15 '11 at 3:55
    
The fact that the OP uses public inheritance when deriving Derived from Base probably indicates that the OP wants to have IS-A relationship between Derived and Base. Neither some unrelated SafeBase nor protected inheritance fits that intent. –  AnT Jun 15 '11 at 4:36
class Derived : public Base
{
  // This is now private
  using Base::ptr_t;
  using Base::wptr_t;
  // ...
};
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I think that is not the question. OP wants the Base::Type not to be used as Derived::Type anywhere (though it's legal). –  iammilind Jun 15 '11 at 3:48
    
@iammilind The example in the OP covers public use only. –  Luc Danton Jun 15 '11 at 3:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on the answers of iammilind and Luc Danton, here's what I've come up with:

class Base
{
private:
  // only 'BaseClass' is allowed to derive from Base
  Base() { }
  friend class BaseClass;
public:
  typedef std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr_t;
  typedef std::weak_ptr<Base> wptr_t;

  enum class Type { foo, bar, baz };

  Type x;
  // ...
};

class BaseClass : public Base
{
private:
  // make all the raw_Base types private
  using Base::ptr_t;
  using Base::wptr_t;
  using Base::Type;
};

class Derived : public BaseClass
{
  // define as usual, and now all is well in the world.
};

// now, to test it
class Derived2 : public Base { }; // fails

Derived d;
d.x = Derived::Type::foo; // fails
d.x = Base::Type::foo; // works
// Which is exactly what I wanted.

As far as I can tell, the only problem with this solution is that it adds a new and potentially confusing class. The class is defined in such a way that it can't really be misused – Base itself cannot be derived from except by BaseClass, but still, BaseClass is an unattractive piece of namespace-clutter.

However, for the particular piece of code that I intend to use this in, I happen to be using the equivalent of BaseClass already to solve an unrelated problem. So this BaseClass technique suits my purposes just fine.

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