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I want to combine both the for loops into single for loop. How can i do that?

I want to loop through a to z, and A to Z, like so:

char ch;
for (ch = 'A' ; ch <= 'Z' ; ch++ )
{ 
}
for (ch = 'a' ; ch <= 'z' ; ch++ )
{
}

but using a single loop.

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1  
If you want it in C, why is the question also tagged C++? –  Ted Hopp Jun 15 '11 at 4:05
    
... and the point of this is? –  misha Jun 15 '11 at 4:05
    
@Ted hopp , sorry i removed c++ , that was by mistake. –  kobe Jun 15 '11 at 4:07
    
Is this homework? –  Earlz Jun 15 '11 at 4:08
2  
@kobe: Then you should use isalpha instead of doing this yourself. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:16

14 Answers 14

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I don't personally like this solution, but:

char * letters = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
for (char * ptr = letters; *ptr != 0; ++ptr) {
    char ch = *ptr;
    ...
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Heh, but it works –  Earlz Jun 15 '11 at 4:08
    
@myrkos ptr won't, but *ptr will. Otherwise strlen(letters) wouldn't work. –  Ted Hopp Jun 15 '11 at 4:11
1  
1. +1. 2. Fixed that the OP's code does capital letters first. 3. Expanded the whole alphabet string. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:12
2  
Hmm, I don't actually prefer this approach to Billys. It's less readable (would you notice a missing character in a magic string like that, or notice if the order where unusual?), it's probably slower, and it isn't even any shorter. Not that it really matters in such a simple case... –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 15 '11 at 10:14
1  
I too dislike this solution (mainly for the reasons Eamon pointed out) but if you care about it being completely portable and agnostic to character encoding, I think it's just about the only correct solution. If you're happy to assume ASCII-based encoding, use one of the other answers. –  R.. Jun 15 '11 at 12:38
for (char ch = 'A' ; ch <= 'z' ; ch == 'Z' ? ch = 'a' : ++ch )
{
}

Should work -- though please, please, don't inflict this on your fellow developers.

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+1 for disavowing your own (correct) answer! –  Ted Hopp Jun 15 '11 at 4:09
    
@Ted: Lol -- Thanks! –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:10
1  
+1: simple, works. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 15 '11 at 10:15
1  
@Billy - No, of course I'm on an IBM mainframe. My comment was targeted at @Eamon's "simple, works". Ernest's solution does work, and I can even add the åäö I need for my native language. :-) –  Bo Persson Jun 15 '11 at 17:42
1  
Or to put it another way - the OP says the loop runs from A to Z, not that the values in between A and Z are all Roman uppercase letters :-) So it does "work" on EBCDIC too, it just enumerates a different set of char values, some of which aren't character code points at all. Inadequate specifications can always be weaseled to say whatever it is the code actually does. Goes wrong if 'z' < 'A', mind, but unless Bo whips up a quick C implementation using a charset that he invents today, that's not the case on the machine he's on. –  Steve Jessop Jul 7 '11 at 22:50

You can do it in a nested loop (two loops, but only one body):

for (start = 'A'; start <= 'a'; start += 'a' - 'A') {
    end = start + 'Z' - 'A';
    for (ch = start; ch <= end; ++ch) {
         /* body */
    }
}
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1  
+1 for what looks like the most mind-bendingly-evil answer here. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:18
1  
@Billy Mua-ha-ha! (and thanks!) Code maintenance folk need a challenge now and then. :-) –  Ted Hopp Jun 15 '11 at 4:46
    
I suggest instead char start = 'A'; do{ char end = start + 'Z' - 'A'; char ch; for (ch = start; ch <= end; ++ch) { /* body */ } }while((start = 'A' + 'a' - start) == 'a'); which has no ASCII dependency. –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 10:12
1  
@Jim: that still has the dependancy that a..z are consecutive; and it's not like ASCII/unicode is going anywhere... –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 15 '11 at 10:19
1  
But the goal is to reproduce OP's original looping behavior, not hit every letter and only letters. :) –  Ted Hopp Jun 15 '11 at 13:35

Well, the obvious question is why? ...and the second question is do you care about non-ASCII character sets (as your two loops will fail for EBCDIC), but the quick and dirty way of connecting the two is

for (ch = 'A'; ch <= 'z'; ch++) {
    if (ch > 'Z' && ch < 'a') ch = 'a';
     :
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This is basically the same thing I did except I used the question mark operator. +1. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:17
const char diff = 'a' - 'A';
for (ch = 'A' ; ch <= 'Z' ; ch++ )
{
  char small_ch = ch + diff;
 //... 
}
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This iterates in a different order than the OP's original code. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:17
    
@Billy, the idea is to combine the contents of both the loops, for caps use ch and for small, use small_ch. –  iammilind Jun 15 '11 at 4:24
    
Yes, that's true. However, strictly speaking, the OP's code iterates as "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz", while this example will iterate as "AaBbCcDdEeFfGgHhIiJjKkLlMmNnOoPpQqRrSsTtUuVvWwXxYyZz". If the order would matter the result would be different. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:27
    
@Billy thanks for all the comments and your time –  kobe Jun 15 '11 at 4:31
    
I think this misses the point. If you're going to repeat the logic, once for ch and once for small_ch, you might as well have to loops. What is wanted is for the single variable ch to iterate over A .. Z a .. z and to apply some logic to it each time. –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 10:02
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
int main()
{
    int i;
    char e;
    for(i=65;i<=122;i++)
    {
                        if(i<91||i>96)
                        {
                            e=i;
                        printf("%c\n",e);
                        }
                        }

    getch();
}
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Try this:

        for (int i = 0; i < 52; ++i)
            printf("%c\n", 'A' + i + ('a' - 'Z' - 1) * (i/26));
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Replacing 6 with ('a' - 'Z') would remove the ASCII dependency. –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 9:32
1  
Eamon Nerbonne points out that the mere fact that 'a' .. 'z' are contiguous is an ASCII dependency ... only Ernest Friedman-Hill's answer avoids that. (Still, ('a' - 'Z') is less obscure than 6.) –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 10:48
for (int i=0;i<26;++i) {

     char ch = 'A' + i;
     // Logic for Uppercase letters.

     char ch1 = 'a' + i;
     // Logic for Lowercase letters.

}
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This iterates in a different order than the OP's answer. –  Billy ONeal Jun 15 '11 at 4:13
    
@Billy ONeal Ya, but to print the character count, this would suffice I guess. –  N.R.S.Sowrabh Jun 15 '11 at 4:19
    
Um, I think the whole point is to avoid duplicating the logic, which is presumably the same for all characters. –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 9:34

A straightforward solution is

int i;
for(i = 0; i < 52; i++){
  char ch = i + (i < 26? 'A' : 'a');
  /* do something with ch */
}

although I prefer, especially in sensible languages that allow nested functions,

for(ch = 'A'; ch <= 'Z'; ch++)
  dosomething(ch);
for(ch = 'a'; ch <= 'z'; ch++)
  dosomething(ch);

P.S. Kobe, I see in one of your comments that your reason for the loops is to check whether a character is a letter ... but looping is a horrid way to do that. You could simply do

if(('A' <= c && c <= 'Z') || ('a' <= c && c <= 'z')){
    /* c is a letter */
}

or, considerably better,

#include ctype.h
...
if(isalpha((unsigned char)c)){
    /* c is a letter */
}

(To understand why that cast is needed, read the isalpha man page and the C language standard. This is one of several abominable aspects of C.)

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for (char ch = 'A'; ch <= 'z'; ch = ch == 'Z'?'a':ch+1) {
       //loop body
}

This approach is similar to Billy's, but with a slightly less nasty loop-increment statement. I wouldn't mind inflicting this on a fellow dev, though I might write the increment statement as a function to clarify if the increment statement got any more complex:

char nextChar(char c) { return c == 'Z' ? 'a' : c+1; }

for (char ch = 'A'; ch <= 'z'; ch = nextChar(ch)) {
       //loop body
}
share|improve this answer
    
To compare apples to apples, expand ch++ in Billy's code and you get ch == 'Z'?ch='a':ch=ch+1; you've simply factored out the ch= and moved it further way from its rhs, which could be considered more nasty. As for infliction, neither of these (nor quite a few other answers here) would pass my code review. –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 10:42
    
Well, I like my expressions side-effect free; so I much prefer x = some-side-effect-free-expression to an if disguised as a ternary. Such a formulation also lends itself better to function extraction (without worrying about aliasing and whatnot). Furthermore, the quintessential for-loop is an initialization, a test, and an increment, so the closer to that pattern I can stay, the happier I am -- of course, it's all so trivially short none of this would bother me, but to each their own. The badness really depends on context. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 15 '11 at 14:34

Try this:

for ($i = 0;$i < 26;$i++)
{
echo chr(97+$i);
}
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It's pointless, just use one for loop. The variables are mainly used as counters, or boundaries for the loop so it knows when to terminate. Just make one loop. Two loops are completely unnecessary.

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The loops themselves as written are pointless, because they do nothing ... obviously, the OP intends to put code (the same code twice) inside those loops. The OP is asking how to do it with one loop rather than two. Your "answer" doesn't answer the question, misses the point, and repeats itself three times over. (And I'm not even the downvoter.) –  Jim Balter Jun 15 '11 at 9:11
void main()
{   
    char ch;

    for(ch= 65 ; ch <= 122 ; ch++)
    {
        if ( ch>=91 && ch<=96)
        continue;                     //hey check this out if this helps
        printf("%c \n",ch);
    }

}
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for (ch = 'A';ch <= 'z';ch++) {

}

This will also include a few characters such as '[' and ']'...

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