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I have these lines of code in my program. I want to implement setTimeout in a javascript class. I tried storing "this" but seems didn't work out for me. In this class logic is if input is 0, then it will show output 0, but if input is 1 it will start a timer which is already specified and after that timer finishes it will give output its a ondelay timer.

ONDClass = function(){
    this.id;
    this.input;
    this.source;
    this.target;
    this.timer;
        var timerValue;
        this.TimerID;
        this.TotalSeconds;
        var thisObj = this;
        var c = 0;
        this.setID = function(id){
              this.id = id;
              timerValue = this.id + "C";
        }

        this.getID = function(){
              return this.id;
        }

        this.setTimer = function(timer){
              this.timer = timer
        }

        this.getTimer = function(timer){
              return this.timer;
        }

    this.UIelementTaget = function(target){
        this.target = target;
    }

        this.UIelementSource = function(source){
        this.source = source;
    }

    this.setInput = function(input){
        this.input = input;
    }

    this.getInput = function(){
        return this.input
    }

        this.UpdateTimer = function(){
            console.log(c);
            document.getElementById(timerValue).innerHTML = c;
        }

        this.createTimer = function(timerValue,time){
              this.TimerID = document.getElementById(timerValue);
              this.TotalSeconds = time;
             // this.UpdateTimer();

              setTimeout(function() { 
                    document.getElementById(timerValue).innerHTML = c;
                    console.log(c);
                    thisObj.Tick();
              }, 1000)
        }

        this.Tick = function(){
              c++
              //this.UpdateTimer();

              if(c < this.TotalSeconds){
                    setTimeout(function() { 
                                document.getElementById(timerValue).innerHTML = c;
                                console.log(c);
                                thisObj.Tick();
                          }, 1000)
              } else {
                    return this.input;
              }
        }


        this.getOutput = function(){
              if(this.input == 0){
                    var htmltimer = "<div id = " + timerValue + " class = 'timerValue'>" + this.getTimer() + "</div>";
                    $("#" + this.id).append(htmltimer);
                    return this.input;
              } else {
                    var htmltimer = "<div id = " + timerValue + " class = 'timerValue'></div>";
                    $("#" + this.id).append(htmltimer);
                    this.createTimer(timerValue,this.getTimer());
                    return this.input;
              }
    }

       this.getUISourceElement = function(){
              if(this.source == undefined)
                   return false;
              else
                    return true;
        }

        this.addExtraDiv = function(){
        var divinput = this.id +"I";
              var divoutput = this.id +"O";
              var htmlinput = "<div id = " + divinput + " class = 'inputBoxTimer'>" + this.getInput()+ "</div>";
              var htmloutput = "<div id = '" + divoutput + "' class = 'outputBoxTimer'>" + this.getOutput() + "</div>";
              $("#" + this.id).append(htmloutput);
              $("#" + this.id).append(htmlinput);

        }
}

The problem is with the setTimeout function. It's not calling every time and it's giving me same output weather its 1 or 0

share|improve this question
    
this.timerId=setTimeout... –  mplungjan Jun 15 '11 at 5:28
    
do you mean that thisObj.Tick() method is not being called? –  mridkash Jun 15 '11 at 5:30
    
yes thisObj.Tick() method is not being called –  yashprit Jun 15 '11 at 5:32
1  
Don't use the third argument with setTimeout, it isn't supported by all browsers. You keep thisObj in a closure and don't use the passed value anyway. Also, only post minimal code to show error, not slabs that are irrelevant. And you don't need to "declare" properties at the top of the constructor, just assign to them as needed. $("#" + this.id).append(...) can be just $(this).append(...). Only names for constructors should start with a captial letter. Finally, keep a count of where you are up to, when TotalSeconds = 0, stop calling Tick. –  RobG Jun 15 '11 at 5:55
    
BTW, what is an "ondely timer"? –  RobG Jun 15 '11 at 5:57

1 Answer 1

thisObj in this.Tick is a not a reference to the parent. So you'll have to set a reference in the parent to itself (if your code is part of a constructor function, setting a variable would be sufficient (var thisObj = this) otherwise I can't tell from the code you presented where you'll have to set it. In a constructor function It should look like:

var Parent = function(){
   var thisObj = this;
   /* ... */
   this.Tick = { /*... */ };
   /* etc. */ 
}

Second, setTimeout receives 2 parameters, not 3. The third parameter you supply is ignored. (see comments and this page)

Third: if you recursively want to call Tick every x milliseconds using a timeout, that's the same as running Tick with an interval of x milliseconds. Javascript contains setInterval for that, so that's what you should use: setInterval(thisObj.Tick, 1000);

share|improve this answer
    
Newer browsers (except IE) do support additional parameters to setTimeout(). –  Alnitak Jun 15 '11 at 5:44
    
I think your point #1 is wrong too - as he always calls it as thisObj.Tick() then thisObj becomes the context (i.e. this) which is then stored in thisObj again for the next time around. –  Alnitak Jun 15 '11 at 5:50
    
@Alnitak: you're right, edited the answer. Concerning thisObj, I'm not sure. From MDN: Code executed by setTimeout() is run in a separate execution context to the function from which it was called. As a consequence, the this keyword for the called function will be set to the window (or global) object, it will not be the same as the this value for the function that called setTimeout. –  KooiInc Jun 15 '11 at 5:59
    
@kooilnc yes, but that only applies to the immediate callback, which in his case is a closure which has thisObj in scope. Hence when that callback calls thisObj.Tick that call does have its own context. I'm trying to replicate the code to find the real fault - the timers just seem to work fine on Chrome. –  Alnitak Jun 15 '11 at 6:02
1  
KooiInc - calling setTimeout sequentially is similar to using setInterval and has benefits (e.g. it can correct for time slippage, don't need to remember timoutID) but the OP doesn't take advantage of that here. –  RobG Jun 15 '11 at 6:16

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