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The <h3> in the following code is forcing a vertical scrollbar, which is, in turn, causing a blank space (it's red; i.e. the body) at the top of the page.

Why?

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" > 
    <title>Test</title>



<style type="text/css">

html { height: 100%; }



body {
    background-color:#f00;
    margin:0; 
    padding:0;
    height:100%;
} 



#divParent1 {
    background-color:#0f0;
    background-image:url("example1_bg.png");
    background-repeat: repeat;
    height:100%;
    margin:0 auto;
    padding:0;
}



#div1 { 
    background-image:url(example1_white_center.png); 
    background-repeat: repeat-y;
    background-position: center;
    width:1200px;
    min-width:1200px;
    _width:1200px;
    height:100%;
    margin:0 auto;
}



#div2{
    background-image:url(example1_dgreen_blank.png); 
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    height:100%;
    margin:0;
}

</style>

</head>







<body>

<div id="divParent1">
    <div id="div1">
        <div id="div2">
            <div style="width:100%; position:relative; top:240px; margin:0;">
                <div style="margin:0 auto; width:570px; background-color:#00f; ">

<h3>LOLOL</h3>

hi<br>hi<br>hi<br>hi<br>hi<br>hi<br>hi<br>

                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>




</body>
</html>

Note: This result cannot be replicated on jsfiddle, making me even more confused.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So today you learn something new about HTML. Margins combine/collapse/merge. So the margin on the H3 element is combining with the margin on the body element, and giving the body element the margin.

See http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/box.html#collapsing-margins

You can add intervening elements (padding, border) to prevent this, or remove the margin from the H3 element.

This was done (I believe) because that's how the original P tag worked. Above and below the P tag was some space - but if you had two P tags one after the other, you did not get twice the space, but rather just once. In order to replicate this behavior when HTML switched to CSS they created 'margin', and made it combine.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, removing the margin & padding on the <h3> fixed it. I did a little bit of tinkering, under the impression that it was probably the left/right margin/padding that was the problem, but it was, in fact, the top. Seems rather odd to me that the top would be causing the problem, but the left, right, and bottom margins seemed to have no effect. W3.org Link bookmarked. Thanks! –  TimFoolery Jun 15 '11 at 15:06

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