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For a new project I need to write a JavaScript library and I'm not sure how to structure it. I read many articles and questions here on stackoverflow yesterday.

I like to support public and private functions and classes. So here is my result:

(function(window) {

    var Library = Library || {};

    // Library namespace
    Library = (function() {
        function privateFunc() {
            return "I'm a private functon in Library.";
        }
        var privateClass = function(param) {
            var _param = param;    
        }
        return {
            constructor: Library,
            publicFunc: function() {
                return "I'm a publicFunc functon in Library.";
            }
        };
    })();

    // String namespace
    _namespace('String');
    Library.String = (function() {
        function privateFunc() {
            return "I'm a private functon in Library.String.";
        }
        return {
            constructor: Library.String,
            publicFunc: function() {
                return "I'm a publicFunc functon in Library.String.";  
            },
            publicClass: function(param) {
                var _param = param;
            }
        };
    })();

    // global function
    function _namespace(name) {
        ...
    }

    // register libary
    window.Library= window.$L = Library;

})(window);

Is this a good way to structure a library or are there better ways? And how do I implement private and public functions for my privateClass/publicClass?

Thank you

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1  
There are other javascript frameworks that can do this for you, such as jQuery, mootools, prototype, etc. If you really want to do this yourself, why don't you have a look in their codebase? –  Spoike Jun 15 '11 at 6:41
    
read underscore. Use that structure. –  Raynos Jun 15 '11 at 6:45
    
@Spoike do what for him? He's writing an arbitary library and wants to know how to structure his file. jQuery, Mootools, prototype, etc are not going to help him –  Raynos Jun 15 '11 at 6:47
1  
@Spoike Yes, we're using jQuery too. I don't want to write my own framework but structure my own JavaScript code. @Raynos You're right and thank you for the link. –  Torben Jun 15 '11 at 6:48
    
@Raynos: Handling of classes and whatnot is available in these. And I'm just saying as a tip that if you're writing an arbitrary library then you should read up on how other frameworks do it. There are lots of them, just take your pick. :-) –  Spoike Jun 15 '11 at 6:50
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2 Answers

There is no notion of private / public functions in javascript. By convention functions that start with underscore are considered private.

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3  
not really true: function(){ var privateFn = function(){}; } –  zyklus Jun 15 '11 at 6:43
    
Yes but you can use functions within "classes" like cwolves example, so they are not accessible from outside the class. –  Torben Jun 15 '11 at 6:55
1  
@cwolves You seem to be confusing local and scope with some generic concept of privacy that doesn't exist in this language. –  Raynos Jun 15 '11 at 7:15
    
@Raynos - I'm not confusing the two, I'm saying that my example acts like a private function. And if it looks like a duck, sounds like a duck and acts like a duck... –  zyklus Jun 15 '11 at 7:16
    
@cwolves there's nothing private about it. The instance variables in strawman are private. there is a clear distinction between closures and local variables and private data bound to an object. –  Raynos Jun 15 '11 at 7:20
show 11 more comments

Just to mess with Raynos (I wrote this years ago):

Private, Public and Static variables

The way that we define variables in our Objects determines what methods our Objects have available to access those variables. In JavaScript, there are five levels of methods and properties when working with OO code.

  • Private Declared with 'var variableName' or 'function functionName' inside of the object. Can only be accessed by other private or privileged functions.

  • Public Declared with 'this.variableName' inside of the object. Can be changed by any function or method.

  • Privileged Declared with 'this.functionName = function(){ ... }' inside of the object. Can be accessed by any function or method and can call reference or change any Private variable.

  • Prototype Declare with 'Class.prototype.variableName' or 'Class.prototype.functionName'. Functions declared this way will have access to any public or prototype variables. Attempts to change variable created this way will instead create a new public variable on the object and the prototype variable will be unavailable.

  • Static Declare with 'Class.variableName' or 'Class.functionName'. Can be changed by any function or method. This method is rarely used. To understand these different levels, let's look at an example:


function Cat(name, color){

    /*
    Constructor: any code in here is run when the object is created
    */
    Cat.cats++;

    /*
    Private variables and functions - may only be accessed by private or privileged functions.

    Note that 'name' and 'color', passed into the Class, are already private variables.
    */
    var age  = 0;
    var legs = 4;
    function growOlder(){
        age++;
    }

    /*
    Public variables - may be accessed publicly or privately
    */
    this.weight = 1;
    this.length = 5;

    /*
    Privileged functions - may be accessed publicly or privately
    May access Private variables.

    Can NOT be changed, only replaced with public versions
    */
    this.age = function(){
        if(age==0) this.length+=20;

        growOlder();
        this.weight++;
    }
}

/*
Prototyped Functions - may be accessed publicly
*/
Cat.prototype = {
    talk:     function(){ alert('Meow!'); },
    callOver: function(){ alert(this.name+' ignores you'); },
    pet:      function(){ alert('Pet!'); }
}

/*
Prototyped Variables - may be accessed publicly.
May not be overridden, only replaced with a public version
*/
Cat.prototype.species = 'Cat';

/*
Static variables and functions - may be accessed publicly
*/
Cat.cats = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Ew. Wrong terminology. So 2005. Stop bringing Java into my JavaScript! Seriously though we're not actually answering his question and just having a noise argument. –  Raynos Jun 15 '11 at 7:40
    
Yeah, well I wrote this in 2005 I think :) –  zyklus Jun 15 '11 at 7:44
    
But it's interesting to read ;) –  Torben Jun 15 '11 at 7:47
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