Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to write my own OnCacheAuthorization method for asp.net mvc, so I would control the user access to the site.

I wrote my own logging system, so that after you log in you have to enter some more data until the account is authorized (I control this through a varibale). So if a user doesn't finish the the procedure, he cannot visit other pages on the site.

I wrote the following method:

public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
{
    base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);


    var httpContext = filterContext.HttpContext;
    String culture = HttpContext.Current.Session["Culture"].ToString();
    var identity = httpContext.User.Identity;
    MembershipUser userMembership = Membership.GetUser(identity.Name);
    Guid userId = new Guid(userMembership.ProviderUserKey.ToString());
    String redirectUrl = "~/" + culture + "/Error/UserRegistrationNotFinished";
    httpContext.Request.Url.ToString();
    filterContext.Result = new EmptyResult();

    if ((!userMembership.IsApproved) && AuthorizeCore( filterContext.HttpContext ))
    {
        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Redirect(redirectUrl, true);
    }
    else
    {
        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Redirect(filterContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url.ToString(),true); 
    }
}

This method works. If the user did not finish his login procedure, he is correctly rerouted to UserRegistrationNotFinished page. The problem is that if the login procedure is finished, the method doesn't let him go to the page he entered in the URL. I only get a blank page and the method loops.

How can I write this method, that it will work for approved users as well?

Regards,

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I have found the answer, I missunderstood the whole concept. Here is the solution that works:

public class ActivationRequiredAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    private readonly string _redirectUrl;
    private bool _failedValidation;

    public ActivationRequiredAttribute()
    {
    }

    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        UserInfoRepository _userInfoRepository = new UserInfoRepository();
        var identity = httpContext.User.Identity;
        MembershipUser userMembership = Membership.GetUser(identity.Name);
        Guid userId = new Guid(userMembership.ProviderUserKey.ToString());
        userInfo _userInfo = _userInfoRepository.GetUser(userId);

        if (httpContext == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("httpContext");

        if ((httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated) && (userMembership.IsApproved)&&(_userInfo.userStatus == 1))
        {
            _failedValidation = true;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            _failedValidation = false;
            return false;
        }

        // return false;
    }

    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);
        String redirectUrl = "~/Error/UserRegistrationNotFinished";

        if (!_failedValidation)
        {
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Redirect(redirectUrl, true);
            //filterContext.Result = View(,)
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Two quick comments. First, action filter attributes must be stateless. The same instance of the attribute might be used to service multiple requests, so the _failedValidation flag set by one request may accidentally be read by a different request. Second, never call Response.Redirect() from an MVC application. It doesn't actually prevent the rest of the pipeline from executing, so your controller can still end up being called. Return a RedirectResult instead. –  Levi Jun 30 '11 at 7:47
    
Tested this theory, and it is in fact bad. Try this: Login with an authorized user, then log out. Now revoke that authorization in the database and try to log in again (it fails, of course). Now grant that authorization back to the user and try to log in again... it fails because the validation failure is still in a failed state since OnAuthorization gets called before AuthorizeCore ... sad panda –  Sinaesthetic Jul 22 '13 at 23:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.