Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which one is faster to have database key as String or as Long? If the difference is micro seconds, it does not matter to our application. The table has thousands records/rows. If Long is faster, how to convert a String into Long, are there some Java API so that unique String could be converted to unique long?

share|improve this question
2  
What database is this about? Derby? –  Lukas Eder Jun 15 '11 at 7:48
3  
There is a limited number of Long values, and an infinite number of possible Strings, so the String -> Long conversion you're looking for can't be done. –  Buhb Jun 15 '11 at 7:55
    
@Buhb, I imagine the String column contains only numeric values stored as String... –  Lukas Eder Jun 15 '11 at 7:58
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Which one is faster to have database key as String or as Long?

It is very very likely that a long is faster than a String. For one thing, processors can deal with values of type long "naturally", while a String has to be manipulated via software. Also, a string will likely occupy more memory than a long value which means the caches are under more stress and more data has to be loaded from / saved to disk.

If the difference is micro seconds, it does not matter to our application. The table has thousands records/rows.

So it depends on the operations. If you

If Long is faster, how to convert a String into Long, are there some Java API so that unique String could be converted to unique long?

You can derive an int from a String using it's hash code. This the ints you will get from this method will be well distributed within the allowed range, but are not guaranteed to be unique. Generally it is not possibly to derive a unique int from a string, because there are strictly more strings than long.

Just imagine you build a giant table holding the decimal representation of all long values. Now there is a trivial long <-> string mapping between the two. But this table still does not contain the string "hello world", and there are no more long's left you could use to represent this string.

Generally my advice is: If your source data is naturally of type string, use that and let the database do the optimizations. A table holding "thousands" of entries won't be a problem for any current database. Maybe you can help performance by creating clever indexes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In general, building, maintaining and scanning an index of VARCHAR (String) should be slower than a BIGINT (Long) index.

To see if the difference is important for your use case, I suggest you create two tables of the expected size and run the expected operations (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) against them, and measure the results...

Usually, with this statement, you can delegate the work to your database:

ALTER TABLE my_table
MODIFY key_column BIGINT NOT NULL;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Databases don't use Java types, that use SQL types which can be translated/mapped to Java.

You should use the type which is naturally fits your application because correctness is usually more important than speed.

The difference between long, Long and String is sub-microsecond in Java and if this matters to you, you shouldn't be using a database to do lookups, but cache all the data in memory and use a collection like TLongObjectHashMap

share|improve this answer
add comment

There's no sensible way to answer that. A primary key is a logical feature of a database whereas performance is determined by the physical implementation and what operations you want to perform on it. You might as well ask "Will a red car go faster than a blue one?"

Two different key constraints on different data types are in any case not functionally equivalent. So even given the necessary context it would be an odd and probably not very useful comparison to make.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.