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This is the same question as: Explicit Element Closing Tags with System.Xml.Linq Namespace

but I use Net 4.0 and the answers do not work anymore.

The problem is I save tags with no values really, and my output XML looks like this:

<field/>

But what I need is always opening and closing tag, i.e.

<field></field>

QUESTION: how to do it?

Edits

1

Adding empty nodes:

if (field_xml == null) // always true, because I create the file for the first time
{
    field_xml = new XElement(XMLKeys.field,String.Empty);
    table_xml.Add(field_xml);
}
field_xml.SetAttributeValue(XMLKeys.name, field_info.Name);
// ... setting some other attributes of this node

and later, saving the xml:

var writer = new FullEndingXmlTextWriter(parameters.OutputFilename, Encoding.UTF8);
root_xml.Save(writer);

FullEndingXmlTextWriter is the specialized class which The Evil Greebo pointed out (it is supposed to force explicit closing tag).

share|improve this question
    
Why does it matter? –  Dan Diplo Jun 15 '11 at 8:51
    
@Dan software that "eats" this can be little buggy and not process this syntax correctly, I've been in such situation too. In general yes, this shouldn't matter. –  Petr Abdulin Jun 15 '11 at 9:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can't reproduce your error. This works as expected in both 4.0 and 3.5 netFX:

namespace ExplicitXmlClosingTags
{
    using System.Xml;
    using System.Xml.Linq;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const string ElementRoot = "RootElement";
            const string ElementChild = "ChildElement";
            const string AttributeChild = "ChildAttribute";

            XDocument xDoc = new XDocument();
            XElement root = new XElement(ElementRoot);
            XElement child = new XElement(ElementChild, string.Empty);
            root.Add(child);

            child.SetAttributeValue(AttributeChild, "AttrValue");
            xDoc.Add(root);

            XmlWriterSettings xws = new XmlWriterSettings();
            xws.Indent = true;
            using (XmlWriter xw = XmlWriter.Create("out.xml", xws))
            {
                xDoc.Save(xw);    
            }
        }
    }
}

producing following content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RootElement>
  <ChildElement ChildAttribute="AttrValue"></ChildElement>
</RootElement>
share|improve this answer
    
(Thank you for your answer). Now, that IS interesting. I copied&pasted your example and I do NOT have explicit closing tags (I tried also .Net 3.5). Geee, compatibility... –  greenoldman Jun 17 '11 at 6:02

Explicitly setting the XElement value to an empty string should work. LINQ-to-XML already treats nodes without content (like new XElement("foo")) differently from nodes with content of length zero (like new XElement("foo", string.Empty)), as you can see from the documentation on XElement.IsEmpty.

But in case that doesn't work, or in case you need to fine tune some other aspect of the XML output, you can derive a custom XmlWriter:

public class MyWriter : XmlWriter
{
    private readonly XmlWriter inner;
    public MyWriter(XmlWriter inner)
    {
        this.inner = inner;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        ((IDisposable) inner).Dispose();
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument()
    {
        inner.WriteStartDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument(bool standalone)
    {
        inner.WriteStartDocument(standalone);
    }

    public override void WriteEndDocument()
    {
        inner.WriteEndDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteDocType(string name, string pubid, string sysid, string subset)
    {
        inner.WriteDocType(name, pubid, sysid, subset);
    }

    public override void WriteStartElement(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        inner.WriteStartElement(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override void WriteEndElement()
    {
        inner.WriteFullEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteFullEndElement()
    {
        inner.WriteFullEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteStartAttribute(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        inner.WriteStartAttribute(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override void WriteEndAttribute()
    {
        inner.WriteEndAttribute();
    }

    public override void WriteCData(string text)
    {
        inner.WriteCData(text);
    }

    public override void WriteComment(string text)
    {
        inner.WriteComment(text);
    }

    public override void WriteProcessingInstruction(string name, string text)
    {
        inner.WriteProcessingInstruction(name, text);
    }

    public override void WriteEntityRef(string name)
    {
        inner.WriteEntityRef(name);
    }

    public override void WriteCharEntity(char ch)
    {
        inner.WriteCharEntity(ch);
    }

    public override void WriteWhitespace(string ws)
    {
        inner.WriteWhitespace(ws);
    }

    public override void WriteString(string text)
    {
        inner.WriteString(text);
    }

    public override void WriteSurrogateCharEntity(char lowChar, char highChar)
    {
        inner.WriteSurrogateCharEntity(lowChar, highChar);
    }

    public override void WriteChars(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        inner.WriteChars(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        inner.WriteRaw(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(string data)
    {
        inner.WriteRaw(data);
    }

    public override void WriteBase64(byte[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        inner.WriteBase64(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        inner.Close();
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        inner.Flush();
    }

    public override string LookupPrefix(string ns)
    {
        return inner.LookupPrefix(ns);
    }

    public override WriteState WriteState
    {
        get { return inner.WriteState; }
    }
}

The relevant method is this one:

public override void WriteEndElement()
{
    inner.WriteFullEndElement(); // always write both start and close tags
}
share|improve this answer
    
Similar example of what Martinho is talking about here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1849214/… I had the same question - I had a black box app that NEEDED full formed XML and using the modified XmlWriter worked quite well to ensure never sending contracted empty tags. –  The Evil Greebo Jun 15 '11 at 9:57
    
Thank you for the idea (btw. your code is incorrectly written -- in the same time you inherit and compose XmlWriter, in fact you should inherit, override only constructors and relevant method), but... I am some unlucky guy, it still does not work as intended. I put an edit in my original post. –  greenoldman Jun 16 '11 at 6:23
    
@macias: the inheritance+composition was on purpose. The MyWriter I wrote is a decorator. It works with any XmlWriter, not just with XmlTextWriter. I tested it exactly as is, and it works. I compose to get an existing implementation of XmlWriter, and I inherit to expose the same interface. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 16 '11 at 9:12
    
then you should inheritic from generic class which base class is XmlWriter. Inheriting from another class and not using it, and on the same time composing is a bad idea (in general it could be much worse then here, because constructor could be non-trivial). –  greenoldman Jun 17 '11 at 5:18

set the value of the XElement to String.Empty

OR

setting the IsEmpty property to false for all elements not having any child nodes

    foreach (XElement childElement in
        from x in document.DescendantNodes().OfType<XElement>()
        where x.IsEmpty
        select x)
    {
        childElement.IsEmpty = false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I did, this is the answer from the previous post, but it does not work. –  greenoldman Jun 15 '11 at 8:57
    
edited answer to show another method, setting IsEmpty to false. –  harryovers Jun 15 '11 at 9:35
    
you compiled this code? Because here I got error with pretty expected message, that IsEmpty is read-only property. Curious how you made it :-) –  greenoldman Jun 16 '11 at 5:38
    
lol, good catch :) –  harryovers Jun 16 '11 at 10:04
    
@greenoldman what you could do, and i Tested it, is changing the value to string.Empty that also does explicitly close the XML element –  Lukas Huzen Aug 14 '13 at 14:33

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