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I have a datagridview, and I want to remove a particular row from it (datagridview is not data bound). To remove, I need the index of the row. Datagridview items are all objects. At this moment, all I have is the id (a property) of the object. I want to know the index of the row in datagridview which holds the object of id, say 2.

How do I accomplish this? Or is there another way of deleting a row based on an object's value?

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Can you edit your question to include any code that you tried already? –  Barry Jun 15 '11 at 9:04
    
@Barry I have not one clue how to do that. Hence I could not try any code. I'm stuck at dg.Rows.RemoveAt(?). Sorry.. –  nawfal Jun 15 '11 at 9:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's probably a cleaner way, but with LINQ:

private int GetIndexOfRowWithId(DataGridView dataGrid, int id) {
    return dataGrid.Rows.Cast<MyRowObj>().Select((row, index) => new {
        index,
        row
    }).Where(x => x.row.id == id).Select(x => x.index).First();
}

and without LINQ:

private int GetIndexOfRowWithId(DataGridView dataGrid, int id) {
    for (int i = 0; i < dataGrid.Rows.Count; i += 1) {
        MyRowObj row = (MyRowObj)dataGrid.Rows[i].Tag; // or.DataBoundItem;
        if (row.id == id) {
            return i;
        }
    }

    throw new ArgumentException("No item with specified id exists in the dataGrid.", "id");
}
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1  
In the LINQ version, don't you need to cast the rows to something before you can use Select? i.e. dataGrid.Rows.Cast<MyRowObj>().Select ... –  Cocowalla Jun 15 '11 at 9:13
    
True. I've added that to my example. –  ICR Jun 15 '11 at 9:17
    
@ICR I use .net 2.0. Forgot to mention that. Let me try your 2nd approach. Thanks –  nawfal Jun 15 '11 at 9:39
    
@ICR what is i+=1? is it different from i++? –  nawfal Jun 15 '11 at 10:09
1  
@nawfal i += x will add x to i. It's a stylistic choice really - I don't see the need for the increment operator in a language when you have += (yes, the increment operator has other uses, but I tend to try and avoid those). Feel free to replace it with i++. –  ICR Jun 15 '11 at 10:15

A LINQ'ish approach.

var row = dataGrid.Rows.OfType<MyRowObj>().FirstOrDefault(r => r.id == id);
if (row != null) {
   var rowIndex = dataGrid.Rows.IndexOf(row);
   // ... if you need the row index
} else {
   // cry :(
}

Here I use Rows.IndexOf -- otherwise the index could be worked into the LINQ query. There are a number of such examples on SO. (Like the one ICR added to his answer :)

Happy coding.

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Thanks for that, but I use .net 2.0. Forgot to mention that. Nevertheless thanks..Let me try @ICR 's.. –  nawfal Jun 15 '11 at 9:38

If your DataGridView's DataSource is a BindingSource and the underlying list implements FindCore then you can use the BindingSource Find() method like so:

BindingList<YourObject> objectList = new BindingList<YourObject>();
BindingSource source = new BindingSource();
source.DataSource = objectList;

dataGridView1.DataSource = source;

private int GetIndexOfItemById(int id)
{
    return source.Find("Id", id);
}

This is arguably the right way of doing it, and might give you better performance (which you probably won't need). However, Microsoft haven't made using this easy. The framework BindingList object does not implement FindCore so you will need to create your own IBindingList() (as well as implementing sorting, since you probably want that too).

Here is the code for an IBindingList implementation that supports Find() (taken from MSDN).

protected override bool SupportsSearchingCore
{
    get
    {
        return true;
    }
}

protected override int FindCore(PropertyDescriptor prop, object key)
{
    // Get the property info for the specified property.
    PropertyInfo propInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(prop.Name);
    T item;

    if (key != null)
    {
        // Loop through the items to see if the key
        // value matches the property value.
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; ++i)
        {
            item = (T)Items[i];
            if (propInfo.GetValue(item, null).Equals(key))
                return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

If you are using a DataTable as your DataSource then you get the Find() behaviour out of the box, but since you say you have a list of custom objects, you probably aren't.

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the first method seems quite easy, not the second though. No I haven't bound any data source to datagridview since that makes removing and inserting rows a mess. –  nawfal Jun 15 '11 at 18:49
var select = from DataGridViewRow row in _dataGrid.Rows where 

((DataRowView)row.DataBoundItem).Row == boundedRow select row;
if (select.Count() > 0)
{
    actions
}
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1  
A little bit more explanation would be nice. 'var select' is maybe not the best name when using the LINQ select keyword in the same expression. –  wonko79 Jan 27 at 17:04

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