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I have a design issue that I encounter currently.

Let's say there is a hierarchy of components. Each of these component derives from an abstract Component type which looks something like this:

public abstract class Component
{
    public abstract Component Parent { get; }
    public abstract ComponentCollection Children { get; }
}

Now I want to add some optional functionality to those components, lets take being able to search within the component hierarchy and to select components within the hierarchy as examples.

Is it considered bad practice to provide those optional functionality in the base class like this:

public abstract class Component
{
    // Other members

    public abstract bool IsSearchable { get; }
    public abstract bool Search(string searchTerm);

    public abstract bool IsSelectable { get; }
    public abstract bool Select();
}

While the "search-ability" and "select-ability" is managed in derived components by e.g. using strategy patterns?

Somehow this seems like violation of the SRP to me, but in my opinion the only alternative would be to have an interface for each optional functionality and only implement it on components that support this functionality.

In my opinion this would have the drawback that I have to write code like this everytime I want to check if a component provides specific functionality:

public bool Search(Component component, string searchTerm)
{
    ISearchable searchable = component as ISearchable;
    if(searchable != null)
    {
        searchable.Search(searchTerm);
    }
}

Which strategy would you choose or do you have any better ideas?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Why does the drawback you point out differ substantially from your current code, which has to check component.IsSearchable() first? – Joris Timmermans Jun 15 '11 at 9:18
    
Well this is what I am not sure about. Personally I would consider checking a property to be cleaner (and probably faster) than checking the type of an object. – Florian Greinacher Jun 15 '11 at 9:21
1  
Conceptually the type of an object is one of its properties (in the general sense), so that's not an issue. Performance could be an issue, and probably will be in a language like C++ but perhaps not in Java or C#. Also consider the benefits of having an ISearchable interface - you might have non-Components that are searchable too. – Joris Timmermans Jun 15 '11 at 9:24
    
@MadKeithV: This is true, but how should should someone know that she can cast a Component to ISearchable in some cases. This is not pretty declarative in my opinion. – Florian Greinacher Jun 17 '11 at 7:19
    
@Florian - they can look at the class declaration and see that Component is derived from ISearchable (if all Components have a default implementation of ISearchable). That is no different from looking at the class interface to see the member functions IsSearchable etc. – Joris Timmermans Jun 17 '11 at 7:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A possible option:

If the searchability/selectability implementation is provided through the strategy pattern (dependency injection), as you say, then I think interfaces for ISearchable and ISelectable are a better idea.

You can derive your strategy object from these interfaces, and implement getters for them in your base-Component class - GetSearchable(), GetSelectable() - where the default implementation in Component returns null (or a no-op implementation of the interface if you dislike null).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, seems reasonable to me. I will try to do it this way. – Florian Greinacher Jun 17 '11 at 7:21

Why don't you use decorator?

Component c = new Component ();
var selectableAndSearchableOne = new SelectableComponent (new SearchableComponent (c));
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea pretty much, but how do I access select / search functionality when working with Component? – Florian Greinacher Jun 17 '11 at 7:18
    
A potential downside to this solution is that it has to work at compile-time - i.e. SearchableComponent must be constructible from Component. In the case as presented this doesn't sound like an issue, but I can imagine scenarios where you do not know at compile-time whether "c" is actually of a searchable/selectable type. On the other hand, if you really want to force all components to be at least default-searchable and selectable, then getting compile-time errors when you've made a mistake is positive, not negative. – Joris Timmermans Jun 17 '11 at 7:44
    
I don't see any downside. The request you mentioned "i want the components that are searchable" this is a design leak i think. it carves out complexity. It's not the responsibility of the component (that is positioned at more high level layer). – jack-london Jun 18 '11 at 22:40

Ok another one: this time you also know the component's extension points. with a visitor-like pattern

public interface IHasExtensions
    {
        List<Extension> Extensions { get; }
        void Extend (Extension ext);
    }

    public class Component : IHasExtensions
    {
        List<Extension> exts = new List<Extension> ();

        public List<Extension> Extensions
        {
            get { return exts; }
        }

        public void Extend (Extension ext)
        {
            exts.Add (ext);
        }

        void Draw() { }
    }

    public abstract class Extension
    {
        readonly protected Component _Component;

        public Extension(Component component)
        {
            _Component = component;
        }
    }

    public class SearchExtension : Extension
    {
        public SearchExtension (Component component) : base (component)
        {

        }
    }

    public class SelectionExtension : Extension
    {
        public SelectionExtension (Component component) : base (component)
        {

        }
    }

    public class test_fly
    {
        void start ()
        {
            Component c = new Component ();
            c.Extend (new SearchExtension (c));
            c.Extend (new SelectionExtension (c));

            var exts = c.Extensions; // I Know the extensions now
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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