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I am trying to write an extension method in order to refactor a linq many-to-many query I'm writing. I am trying to retrieve a collection of Post(s) which have been tagged with any of the Tag(s) in a collection passed as a parameter to my method.

Here are the relevant entities along with some of their properties:

Post

Scalar Properties: PostID, PostDate

Navigation Property: PostTags

PostTag

Scalar Properties: PostTagID, PostID, TagID

Navigation Properties: Post, Tag

Tag

Scalar Properties: TagID

Navigation Property: PostTags

This is the query I'm currently using which works well:

public IEnumerable<Post> GetPostsByTags(IEnumerable<Tag> tags)
{
    return from pt in context.PostTags
           from t in tags
           where pt.TagID == t.TagID &&
                 pt.Post.PostDate != null
           orderby pt.Post.PostDate descending
           select pt.Post;               
}   

This is the (probably incorrect) start of the extension method I'm struggling to create:

public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectRange<TSource, TResult>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> collection,
    Func<IEnumerable<TSource>, IEnumerable<TResult>> selector)
{
    return selector(collection);
}

And the ideal simplification of the original query:

public IEnumerable<Post> GetPostsByTags(IEnumerable<Tag> tags)
{
    return from p in context.Posts
           where p.PostTags.SelectRange(x => ?) &&
                 p.PostDate != null                    
           orderby p.PostDate descending
           select p;
}

Any help in writing this extension method, or any other more efficient way to perform this query, will be greatly appreciated.

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Do you want a Post to contain ALL the tags specified? It seems like your method that works well selects Posts that contain ANY tags specified –  Aducci Jun 15 '11 at 14:18
    
@Aducci Meant any - updated question. –  aligray Jun 15 '11 at 14:21
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I think your original query is fine, you just need to handle duplicate posts. Add a distinct to the end. Or you can use the Any method like so.

public IEnumerable<Post> GetPostsByTags(IEnumerable<Tag> tags)
{
    return from p in context.Posts
           where p.PostTags.Any(pt => tags.Any(t => t.TagID == pt.TagID)) &&
                 p.PostDate != null                    
           orderby p.PostDate descending
           select p;
}

Edit - Added another Any statement

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Doesn't this double Any imply a double "cartesian product" logic which is very detrimental to the performance ? Unless it's no a concern here ? –  Ssithra Jun 23 '11 at 13:21
    
I don't know how this is converted into SQL, but I feel it is easy to read –  Aducci Jun 23 '11 at 13:50
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The most efficient way to achieve your goal is probably to use the built-in join clause which is dedicated to such many-to-many relationships :

from pt in PostTags
where pt.Post.PostDate != null
join t in tags on pt.TagID equals t.TagID
orderby pt.Post.PostDate descending
select pt.Post;

It is not "more correct" than the previous options : you already had something working when you posted your question. But it is surely the neater way to have it work in terms of syntax and performance.

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Nice approach, hadn't even considered using join. –  aligray Jun 20 '11 at 20:32
    
@aligray Please note than despite this approach is probably the best one, my answer "as is" has 2 drawback due to the query syntax : you cannot perform a Distinct with this writing style and may have a same Post several times in the output, and I would rather put the order by clause at the end, after all the other operations to sort already filtered and projected items rather than the raw big stuff. –  Ssithra Jun 21 '11 at 7:21
    
@aligray That's why I never rely on the query syntax but on the "dot" one which is more powerful and allow a better control on the data flow.Yet it produces a more complicated join : PostTags.Where(pt => pt.Post.PostDate != null).Join(tags, pt => pt.TagID, t => t.TagID, (pt, t) => pt.Post).Distinct().OrderByDescending(p => p.PostDate) (which this time has no drawback anymore, except a little loss of readability) –  Ssithra Jun 21 '11 at 7:29
    
@aligray By the way, in spite of this little loss of readability, the performance is strictly equal because it is exactly how the query syntax is translated to dot notation before being processed by the compiler (the query syntax is just a syntactic sugar). –  Ssithra Jun 22 '11 at 15:26
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I actually had to come up with my own solution to this issue because I am dealing with a data source that is NOT compatible with the Entity Framework (DBase 4 on an odbc connection) that has quite a few many to many table relations, and instead of having to write out a long drawn out join and group blocks of linq I created two extension methods

Now mind you I am only dealing with one direction reads from the datasource into essentially a dataset this program is only for historical data and does not accept new input or changes so I'm not sure how well these extension methods would hold up to any actual data updates inserts or deletes etc

(I've wrapped each parameter on it's own line for readability)

public static IEnumerable<TResult> ManyToManyGroupBy
    <TLeft, TRight, TMiddle, TLeftKey, TRightKey, TGroupKey, TResult>
    (
      this IEnumerable<TLeft> Left, 
      IEnumerable<TRight> Right, 
      IEnumerable<TMiddle> Middle, 
      Func<TLeft, TLeftKey> LeftKeySelector, 
      Func<TMiddle, TLeftKey> MiddleLeftKeySelector, 
      Func<TRight, TRightKey> RightKeySelector, 
      Func<TMiddle, TRightKey> MiddleRightKeySelector, 
      Func<TLeft, TGroupKey> GroupingSelector, 
      Func<TGroupKey, IEnumerable<TRight>, TResult> Selector
    )
{
  return Left
   .Join(Middle, LeftKeySelector, MiddleLeftKeySelector, (L, M) => new { L, M })
   .Join(Right, LM => MiddleRightKeySelector(LM.M), RightKeySelector, (LM, R) => new { R, LM.L })
   .GroupBy(LR => GroupingSelector(LR.L))
   .Select(G => Selector(G.Key, G.Select(g => g.R)));
}

public static IEnumerable<TResult> ManyToManySelect
    <TLeft, TRight, TMiddle, TLeftKey, TRightKey, TResult>
    (
      this IEnumerable<TLeft> Left, 
      IEnumerable<TRight> Right, 
      IEnumerable<TMiddle> Middle, 
      Func<TLeft, TLeftKey> LeftKeySelector, 
      Func<TMiddle, TLeftKey> MiddleLeftKeySelector, 
      Func<TRight, TRightKey> RightKeySelector, 
      Func<TMiddle, TRightKey> MiddleRightKeySelector, 
      Func<TLeft, TRight, TResult> Selector
    )
{
  return Left
   .Join(Middle, LeftKeySelector, MiddleLeftKeySelector, (L, M) => new { L, M })
   .Join(Right, LM => MiddleRightKeySelector(LM.M), RightKeySelector, (LM, R) => new { R, LM.L })
    .Select(LR => Selector(LR.L, LR.R));
}

They are fairly long methods but they cover join together two tables via the middle table as well as grouping by any particular Left item or a property of the left item

Using them would look like something like this (Like above I've wrapped each parameter on it's own line for readability)

  var EmployeesCoursesTest = Employees.ManyToManySelect
  (
   Courses, 
   CourseParticipations, 
   E => E.SS, 
   CP => CP.SS, 
   C => C.EVENTNO, 
   CP => CP.EVENTNO, 
   (E, C) => new
   {
    C.EVENTNO,
    C.START_DATE,
    C.END_DATE,
    C.HOURS,
    C.SESSIONS,
    Trainings.First(T => T.TRGID == C.TRGID).TRAINING,
    Instructors.First(I => I.INSTRUCTID == C.INSTRUCTID).INSTRUCTOR,
    Locations.First(L => L.LOCATIONID == C.LOCATIONID).LOCATION,
    Employee = E
   }
  );

  var EmployeesCoursesGroupByTest = Employees.ManyToManyGroupBy
  (
   Courses, 
   CourseParticipations, 
   E => E.SS, 
   CP => CP.SS, 
   C => C.EVENTNO, 
   CP => CP.EVENTNO, 
   E => E,
   (E, Cs) => new
   {
    Employee = E,
    Courses = Cs
   }
  );

Maybe it will help you out I myself tend to stay away from the query syntax so I work almost exclusively with the method syntax of Linq, so writing these kinds of extension methods are just a way i think now.

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