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I got a collection of files (apache commons.io) now I want to list theme in jTextArea and I try to this with a task. Unfortunatly the textarea lists only the first file. But in doInBackground I can print a loop and all files get listed.

I want to add a row in my textarea for every filename at the moment when I iterate through it.

private class MyDeleteTask extends Task<String, String> {

    public MyDeleteTask(Application app) {
        super(app);
    }

    @Override
    protected String doInBackground() throws Exception {

        File file = new File("c:/files");
        Collection<File> files = FileUtils.listFiles(file, null, true);

        for (File f : files) {
            publish(f.getAbsolutePath());
        }

        return "";
    }

    @Override
    protected void process(List<String> values) {
        jTextArea.append(values.get(0) + "\n");
    }
}
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what does publish() function do. Also jTextAera.append() is getting only the first String from the List. –  Talha Ahmed Khan Jun 15 '11 at 10:05
    
publish is a method which is not implemented. Its a Task method which is (normally) not used. It just serves a list for process. –  Josh Jun 15 '11 at 10:16

5 Answers 5

You are taking only first value.values.get(0) will return only first element in list not all elements in list. Try this:

@Override
protected void process(List<String> values) {
    for(String str:values)
      jTextArea.append(str + "\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks folks for the fast replies! When I do the foreach in process() I get the whole bunch of files in my textarea, which causes that the gui freezes a bit. So I want to update the textarea while iterating. While looking at some swing task tutorials I guess I can use process without a for loop –  Josh Jun 15 '11 at 10:12

To be honest, I don't think you are using Task (actually a SwingWorker subclass) the best way for your situation.

publish() is useful only when you can call it in between background steps that each are long-running; that's not the case for you, because I doubt f.getAbsolutePath() takes very long.

I would rather suggest some simple refactoring as follows:

private class MyDeleteTask extends Task<String, Void> {
    public MyDeleteTask(Application app) {
        super(app);
    }

    @Override
    protected String doInBackground() throws Exception {
        File file = new File("c:/files");
        Collection<File> files = FileUtils.listFiles(file, null, true);
        StringBuilder paths = new StringBuilder();
        boolean first = true;
        for (File f : files) {
            if (first) {
                first = false;
            } else {
                paths.append('\n');
            }
            paths.append(f.getAbsolutePath());
        }
        return paths;
    }

    @Override
    protected void succeeded(String value) {
        jTextArea.setText(value);
    }
}

Here I think it is preferrable to calculate the whole text area content in background (String manipulation can take a long time if you have a lot of files to list), and thus also avoid multiple calls to jTextArea.append() (which I believe are heavily using CPU, but this time directly inside the EDT, which is bad and can lead to "GUI freeze" for a potentially long time) and replace them with a single call to setText() whic is much more performant in this case.

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@jfpoilpret hmmm really good catch, +1 –  mKorbel Jun 15 '11 at 12:17
    
I use the swing application framework in netbeans and Task extends from SwingWorker, which my IDE tells me. Is listFiles not the most performance consuming task in my snippet? –  Josh Jun 15 '11 at 13:01
    
listFiles, yes, it's the longest task you have in your snippet, but since it is just one call, then it makes no sense trying to break its results into smaller pieces just to publish() them, part by part. It is much preferrable to directly return the full list, as I have put in my snippet. The downside is that the list will be populated only at the end; but if you want the files list to be populated step by step, then you will have to replace listFiles() with something else, that would be able to return partial results (you won't find that in commons io though). –  jfpoilpret Jun 15 '11 at 13:25
    
Note that I didn't mean to say that you don't use Task! I meant that you didn't use it the proper way for your case, that's different. –  jfpoilpret Jun 15 '11 at 13:26
    
If you want to break down listFiles() then you'll have to make it non-recursive, but then call it recursively by yourself (for every returned File that is a directory), thus you could then publish() files, directory after directory. That makes a bit more work, I'm not sure it is worth it, it highly depends on the current time taken currently (which itself depends on the number of files in the inspected directory). –  jfpoilpret Jun 15 '11 at 13:30
jTextArea.append(values.get(0) + "\n");

You are using 0th value ... try iterating it with for loop.

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Looks like the posted code is not correct. You call publish() method which isn't described but use the process() method passing list of Strings.

Guess you should use in the process

for (String fName:values) {
  jTextArea.append(fName + "\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    @Override
    protected void process(List<String> values) {
        for( String str : values )
        {
           jTextArea.append(str + "\n");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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