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I would like to rotate a non-squared image with Matlab:

  • without using the imrotate function, since it is part of the Image Processing Toolbox,
  • with the loose parameter, wich means the size of the output differs from the size of the input image,
  • and with a not too slow function compared to imrotate.

I have already found a function in order to do this (just replace imshow and bestblk with your own functions in order not to use the toolbox), yet it is really slow for large images. My approach would try to avoid making loops and relying as much as possible on interp2.


The signature of the function would be:

imOutput = my_imrotate(imInput, theta_degres, interpolation, bbox)

where:

  • interpolation would be bilinear, bicubic or nearest,
  • bbox would be crop, or loose.

Crop

I already have a good result with the crop parameter, but I cannot manage to find the offset for the loose parameter.

Here is the code for the crop parameter, where Z is the input and Zi is the output:

Z = double(imInput);
sz = size(Z);
[X,Y] = meshgrid(1:sz(2), 1:sz(1));
%# Center
c = sz(end:-1:1)/2;
%# Angle
t = theta_degres*pi/180;
%# Rotation
ct = cos(t);
st = sin(t);
Xi = c(1) + ct*(X-c(1))-st*(Y-c(2));
Yi = c(2) + st*(X-c(1))+ct*(Y-c(2));
%# Rotation
Zi = interp2(X, Y, Z, Xi, Yi);

Loose

My idea is to compute the size of a frame which would contain the original image as well as the rotated image, and then:

  1. pad the original image so as to have an image whose size is the size of the frame,
  2. use interp2 on the padded image,
  3. crop the resulting image so as to have the rotated image without the remains of the padding.

To get the size of the rotated image with the loose parameter, I compute the rotation_matrix and call rotate_points on the coordinates of the corners p of the input image:

rotation_matrix = [ct, -st; st, ct];
rotate_points = @(p) bsxfun(@plus, c', rotation_matrix * bsxfun(@minus, p, c)')';

Any help would be highly appreciated.


Edit: Using the solution provided in the answer below, and the following code, it seems to work quite right:

%# See the answer below
[sz1,sz2] = size(Z);
sz1New = sz1*cos(t)+sz2*sin(t);
sz2New = sz2*cos(t)+sz1*sin(t);
[Xi,Yi] = meshgrid(-(sz2New-1)/2:(sz2New-1)/2,-(sz1New-1)/2:(sz1New-1)/2);
%# now all that's left is rotating Xi,Yi - I have already subtracted the center

%# My little piece of additional code
Xii = (1+sz2)/2 + ct*Xi - st*Yi;
Yii = (1+sz1)/2 + st*Xi + ct*Yi; 
Zi = interp2(X, Y, Z, Xii, Yii);
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It is surprising this question has 3k views, and yet only 4 upvotes, and the answer only 2 upvotes, although the question is clear and correctly answered. –  Wok Jan 14 '13 at 17:44
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For the loose version, all you need to do is find out how much padding you need. You can estimate it easily with a little bit of geometry:

If you draw the 'loose' rectangle, you're essentially adding four right angle triangles to the original rectangle. The hypotenuse of the triangles are the sides of the rectangle. If you can determine the other two sides, you can easily calculate the length of the new sides and thus the padding. Fortunately, one of the angles of the right triangle is exactly your rotation angle.

As it turns out, you don't even need to calculate the padding explicitly - you simply create a larger array Xi,Yi that has the size of the 'loose' image.

Thus:

[sz1,sz2] = size(Z);
sz1New = sz1*cos(t)+sz2*sin(t);
sz2New = sz2*cos(t)+sz1*sin(t);
[Xi,Yi] = meshgrid(-(sz2New-1)/2:(sz2New-1)/2,-(sz1New-1)/2:(sz1New-1)/2);
%# now all that's left is rotating Xi,Yi - I have already subtracted the center
share|improve this answer
    
That's great! I believe I (almost) got it, thanks to you! –  Wok Jun 15 '11 at 12:25
    
@wok: I just saw that you always add and subtract the center separately. It may be easier if all your meshgrids went from -s/2:s/2, or if you just go 1:szNew in my solution. –  Jonas Jun 15 '11 at 12:40
    
Great! I could rewrite imrotate, yet it is slower than Matlab's imrotate on 900x1000 images. Still acceptable though! :) –  Wok Jun 15 '11 at 14:37
    
Actually, it is faster than Matlab with maketform but slower than Matlab with Mex-file. I don't know what makes the official imrotate choose one or another. –  Wok Jun 15 '11 at 14:51
    
The Mexfile is not used for bicubic interpolation, or for image as double rather than uint8. –  Wok Jun 15 '11 at 15:23
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