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Alert boxes in infinite loop, here I am trying to put a popup alert message on 2 consecutive fields so they cannot be left blank, I know why it is happening - because when onblur event of 1st function is launched it gives focus to second one & when it jumps back to first one onblur of 2nd textfield is launched.

I know validation would be best when done at the form level, but this is the requirement I got.

Any help?

Javascript code

function x()
{
   if( document.getElementById("1").value.length==0)
   {
      alert('1 is required');
      document.getElementById("1").focus();
   }
}

function y()
{
   if(document.getElementById("2").value.length==0)
   {
      alert('2 is required');
      document.getElementById("2").focus();
   }
}

HTML code

<input type="text" name="City Name" id="1" onblur="javascript:x();">
<input type="text" name="Kitty Name" id="2" onblur="javascript:y();">
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2  
Why do you have onblur="javascript:x();" and not just onblur="x();" ? –  Felix Kling Jun 15 '11 at 10:31
    
Why do you have a blank line every other line, and no indentation? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 15 '11 at 10:33

7 Answers 7

There is a fundamental problem when trying to refocus on a field on an onblur when it is invalid. If the user decides to navigate away, the simply can't. When they click away from the field, they are forcibly taken back. I have seen instaces where a user is forced to kill their browser session, just to escape an over-zealous onblur validation.

I realise this might not be the exact solution you are after, but can I recommend another approach that still involves client-side validation.

I recommend you highlight the field as being invlid in some way on the onblur. E.g. put a star next to it, highlight it red, etc. This way you can dispense with the alert and user still has control.

When the user comes to submit the form, you perform your client-side checks and display alert to them then (see @Phill Sacre's answer)

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I also agree with this - onBlur validation is often annoying. Try to suggest an alternative if you can - highlighting invalid fields is often used. –  Phill Sacre Jun 15 '11 at 10:45

My suggestion: consolidate your validation into one method, and check each sequentially in it.

So (pseudo-code):

function validate() {
     for (field in fieldlist) {
         if (document.getElementById(field).value.length == 0) {
              displayerror();
              document.getElementById(field).focus();
         }
     }
}

This way you will only ever display one error at a time.

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+1 For the consolodated validation. (Only 67 to go, now Phil! ;-)) –  James Wiseman Jun 15 '11 at 10:42
    
Hey Phil, I edited the please check again. –  Rohit Sharma Jun 15 '11 at 10:44
    
If validate gets invoked onBlur, doesn't this have the same issues? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 15 '11 at 10:44
    
@Rohit: I can't see that you changed anything of substance. Am I wrong? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 15 '11 at 10:45
    
@Tomalak It should avoid the infinite loop problem because only one text box should be marked invalid (and focussed) at a time. @Rohit I also cannot see any substantial change?! –  Phill Sacre Jun 15 '11 at 10:47

My recommendation is to temporarily disable the blur handler during the execution of the other input's handler.

I've also replaced your HTML onblur with a proper Javascript solution, removed the blank lines and added code indentation.

I've also changed the element IDs, which are not allowed to start with numbers; your script would not have worked at all on compliant browsers.

<html>
<body>

<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = function() {
   document.getElementById("input1").onblur = x;
   document.getElementById("input2").onblur = y;
};

function x() {
   if (document.getElementById("input1").value.length == 0) {
     alert('1 is required');

     // temporarily disable binding
     document.getElementById("input2").onblur = function() {};

     document.getElementById("input1").focus();

     // re-bind
     document.getElementById("input2").onblur = y;
   }
}

function y() {
   if (document.getElementById("input2").value.length == 0) {
     alert('2 is required');

     // temporarily disable binding
     document.getElementById("input1").onblur = function() {};

     document.getElementById("input2").focus();

     // re-bind
     document.getElementById("input1").onblur = x;
   }
}
</script>

<input type="text" name="City Name" id="input1" onblur="javascript:x();">
<input type="text" name="Kitty Name" id="input2" onblur="javascript:y();">

</body>
</html>

Now, this script is rather verbose and carries a lot of code duplication. But in the interests of staying on-topic, I'll leave further improvements for another day.

I would also suggest not doing this at all; as James said, it's irritating.

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Hey Tomalak, this code is still in infinite loop atleast for IE. –  Rohit Sharma Jun 15 '11 at 10:51
    
@Rohit: Worked for me on jsfiddle.net. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 15 '11 at 11:02

My be you have to change your way of comparison from

document.getElementById("1").value.length==0

to

document.getElementById("1").value != ''

it seems to me that length is always not equal zero

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Try this

<html>
    <head>
    <script>

function x() {
   if (document.getElementById("input1").value.length == 0 ) {
     alert('1 is required');
     document.getElementById("input1").focus();

   }
   else  if (document.getElementById("input2").value.length == 0 ) {
     alert('2 is required');
     document.getElementById("input2").focus(); 
   }

}

</script>
    </head>
    <body >
    cityname:
    <input type="text" name="City Name" id="input1" onblur="javascript:x();">
    <br/>
    KittyName:
<input type="text" name="Kitty Name" id="input2" onblur="javascript:x();">

    </body>
</html>
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@ Madhu, thanks It gives alert messages twice in IE? –  Rohit Sharma Jun 15 '11 at 11:55

Here is my solution:

function x()
{
   if( document.getElementById("1").value.length==0)
   {
      alert('1 is required');
      document.getElementById("1").focus();
      return false;
   }
   return true
}

function y()
{
   if(x() && document.getElementById("2").value.length==0)
   {
      alert('2 is required');
      document.getElementById("2").focus();
   }
}

So, if 1 is required, the y function won't be evaluated

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Alex, this code doesnt give focus back to 1 –  Rohit Sharma Jun 15 '11 at 11:46
    
I've made a test, and it works well in IE and FF, but strangely in Chrome. In Chrome the textbox gets the focus, but the cursor doesn't appear –  Alex Such Jun 15 '11 at 11:55
    
You're right, it works if you click out the input, but doesn't if you press the tab key –  Alex Such Jun 15 '11 at 12:01

Instead of handling it in onblur() event, you can handle it in onchange() event.

If you still want to use onblur(), then use the focus inside setTimeout as shown below.

alert('2 is required');
setTimeout(function() { document.getElementById("2").focus(); }, 100); 
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