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I know similar questions have been asked for java, c#, c++, etc, but I couldn't find a way to convert a byte array to a hexidecimal string in C.

I have:

uint8 buf[] = {0, 1, 10, 11};

I want to convert the byte array to a string such that I can print the string using printf:

printf("%s\n", str);

and get (the colons aren't necessary):

"00:01:0A:0B"

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

SOLUTION: Thanks to all of you for helping.

I have a solution:

char buf[] = {0,1,10,11};
int i;
char* buf_str = (char*) malloc (2*size + 1);
char* buf_ptr = buf_str;
for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
{
    buf_ptr += sprintf(buf_ptr, "%02X", buf[i]);
}
sprintf(buf_ptr,"\n");
*(buf_ptr + 1) = '\0';
printf("%s\n", buf_str);
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 31 down vote accepted
printf("%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X", buf[0], buf[1], buf[2], buf[3]);

for a more generic way:

int i;
for (i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
    if (i > 0) printf(":");
    printf("%02X", buf[i]);
}
printf("\n");

to concatenate to a string, there are a few ways you can do this... i'd probably keep a pointer to the end of the string and use sprintf. you should also keep track of the size of the array to make sure it doesnt get larger than the space allocated:

int i;
char* buf2 = stringbuf;
char* endofbuf = stringbuf + sizeof(stringbuf);
for (i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
    /* i use 5 here since we are going to add at most 
       3 chars, need a space for the end '\n' and need
       a null terminator */
    if (buf2 + 5 < endofbuf)
    {
        if (i > 0)
        {
            buf2 += sprintf(buf2, ":");
        }
        buf2 += sprintf(buf2, "%02X", buf[i]);
    }
}
buf2 += sprintf(buf2, "\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Mark - my problem is a bit more complicated. I actually have a buffer with a length of X bytes. I was hoping to find a generic way of doing this for X bytes and having a string as the result. –  Steve Walsh Jun 15 '11 at 11:39
    
Just updated to add code for handling any given number of bytes... assuming x is the length. –  Mark Synowiec Jun 15 '11 at 11:44
    
Thank you again Mark, but the thing I was finding most tricky for this problem is how to print this to a string. –  Steve Walsh Jun 15 '11 at 11:47
    
This answer should still be sufficient then. Do you mean that you want to store a string with the hex values? If so checkout snprintf instead of printf. It allows you to print to a char * string. –  Mr. Shickadance Jun 15 '11 at 11:55
    
I've tried snprintf but I can't get it working. –  Steve Walsh Jun 15 '11 at 11:57

For completude, you can also easily do it without calling any heavy library function (no snprintf, no strcat, not even memcpy). It can be useful, say if you are programming some microcontroller or OS kernel where libc is not available.

Nothing really fancy you can find similar code around if you google for it. Really it's not much more complicated than calling snprintf and much faster.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    unsigned char buf[] = {0, 1, 10, 11};
    /* target buffer should be large enough */
    char str[12];

    unsigned char * pin = buf;
    const char * hex = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    char * pout = str;
    int i = 0;
    for(; i < sizeof(buf)-1; ++i){
        *pout++ = hex[(*pin>>4)&0xF];
        *pout++ = hex[(*pin++)&0xF];
        *pout++ = ':';
    }
    *pout++ = hex[(*pin>>4)&0xF];
    *pout++ = hex[(*pin)&0xF];
    *pout = 0;

    printf("%s\n", str);
}

Here is another slightly shorter version. It merely avoid intermediate index variable i and duplicating laste case code (but the terminating character is written two times).

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    unsigned char buf[] = {0, 1, 10, 11};
    /* target buffer should be large enough */
    char str[12];

    unsigned char * pin = buf;
    const char * hex = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    char * pout = str;
    for(; pin < buf+sizeof(buf); pout+=3, pin++){
        pout[0] = hex[(*pin>>4) & 0xF];
        pout[1] = hex[ *pin     & 0xF];
        pout[2] = ':';
    }
    pout[-1] = 0;

    printf("%s\n", str);
}

Below is yet another version to answer to a comment saying I used a "trick" to know the size of the input buffer. Actually it's not a trick but a necessary input knowledge (you need to know the size of the data that you are converting). I made this clearer by extracting the conversion code to a separate function. I also added boundary check code for target buffer, which is not really necessary if we know what we are doing.

#include <stdio.h>

void tohex(unsigned char * in, size_t insz, char * out, size_t outsz)
{
    unsigned char * pin = in;
    const char * hex = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    char * pout = out;
    for(; pin < in+insz; pout +=3, pin++){
        pout[0] = hex[(*pin>>4) & 0xF];
        pout[1] = hex[ *pin     & 0xF];
        pout[2] = ':';
        if (pout + 3 - out > outsz){
            /* Better to truncate output string than overflow buffer */
            /* it would be still better to either return a status */
            /* or ensure the target buffer is large enough and it never happen */
            break;
        }
    }
    pout[-1] = 0;
}

int main(){
    enum {insz = 4, outsz = 3*insz};
    unsigned char buf[] = {0, 1, 10, 11};
    char str[outsz];
    tohex(buf, insz, str, outsz);
    printf("%s\n", str);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It's not a trick, merely a constant. In the context of the question it is clear that the length of the source we want to convert to hexadecimal is well known (I could have put some hardcoded 4 instead of sizeof). In the general case the function should be called on some input of known length and the target buffer have 3 times + 1 bytes available. This must be ensured by the caller, there is no reason for the conversion function to perform that task. Calling strlen() may be a way to find the source size in some cases, but not always. What if the number to convert to hex contains zeroes ? –  kriss Feb 4 at 17:32

Here is a method that is way way faster :

void bin_to_strhex(unsigned char *bin, unsigned int binsz, char **result)
{
  char          hex_str[]= "0123456789abcdef";
  unsigned int  i;

  *result = (char *)malloc(binsz * 2 + 1);
  (*result)[binsz * 2] = 0;

  if (!binsz)
    return;

  for (i = 0; i < binsz; i++)
    {
      (*result)[i * 2 + 0] = hex_str[(bin[i] >> 4) & 0x0F];
      (*result)[i * 2 + 1] = hex_str[(bin[i]     ) & 0x0F];
    }  
}

//the calling

char buf[] = {0,1,10,11};
char *result;

bin_to_strhex((unsigned char *)buf, sizeof(buf), &result);
printf("result : %s\n", result);
free(result);
share|improve this answer
    
Best to my eye, but you could take advantage of more elegant e.g. char hex[] = "0123456789abcdef". –  Clay Bridges Jun 24 '13 at 11:42
1  
You are totally right, i'm editing it. –  Yannuth Jul 1 '13 at 14:27
2  
This code contains a bug which manifests itself only on strange non-printable inputs (haven't had time to dig into exactly what's going on mathematically). Try to encode the binary of hexadecimal ca9e3c972f1c5db40c0b4a66ab5bc1a20ca4457bdbe5e0f8925896d5ed37d726 and you'll get ÌaÌe3cÌ72f1c5dÌ40c0b4a66Ìb5bÌ1Ì20cÌ4457bÌbÌ5Ì0Ì8Ì258Ì6Ì5Ìd37Ì726 out. To fix this, the bit inside hex_str in the first line of the for loop needs to be changed to (input[i] >> 4) & 0x0F as in @kriss's answer. Then it works fine. –  niemiro Jul 12 '14 at 8:32

I just wanted to add the following, even if it is slightly off-topic (not standard C), but I find myself looking for it often, and stumbling upon this question among the first search hits. The Linux kernel print function, printk, also has format specifiers for outputting array/memory contents "directly" through a singular format specifier:

https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/printk-formats.txt

Raw buffer as a hex string:
    %*ph    00 01 02  ...  3f
    %*phC   00:01:02: ... :3f
    %*phD   00-01-02- ... -3f
    %*phN   000102 ... 3f

    For printing a small buffers (up to 64 bytes long) as a hex string with
    certain separator. For the larger buffers consider to use
    print_hex_dump(). 

... however, these format specifiers do not seem to exist for the standard, user-space (s)printf.

share|improve this answer

There's no primitive for this in C. I'd probably malloc (or perhaps alloca) a long enough buffer and loop over the input. I've also seen it done with a dynamic string library with semantics (but not syntax!) similar to C++'s ostringstream, which is a plausibly more generic solution but it may not be worth the extra complexity just for a single case.

share|improve this answer

If you want to store the hex values in a char * string, you can use snprintf. You need to allocate space for all the printed characters, including the leading zeros and colon.

Expanding on Mark's answer:

char str_buf* = malloc(3*X + 1);   // X is the number of bytes to be converted

int i;
for (i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
    if (i > 0) snprintf(str_buf, 1, ":");
    snprintf(str_buf, 2, "%02X", num_buf[i]);  // need 2 characters for a single hex value
}
snprintf(str_buf, 2, "\n\0"); // dont forget the NULL byte

So now str_buf will contain the hex string.

share|improve this answer
    
this overwrites the first 2 characters over and over.. right? –  xordon Jul 31 '14 at 0:38

ZincX's solution adapted to include colon delimiters:

char buf[] = {0,1,10,11};
int i, size = sizeof(buf) / sizeof(char);
char *buf_str = (char*) malloc(3 * size), *buf_ptr = buf_str;
if (buf_str) {
  for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
    buf_ptr += sprintf(buf_ptr, i < size - 1 ? "%02X:" : "%02X\0", buf[i]);
  printf("%s\n", buf_str);
  free(buf_str);
}
share|improve this answer

This is one way of performing the conversion:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define l_word 15
#define u_word 240

char *hex_str[]={"0","1","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","A","B","C","D","E","F"};

main(int argc,char *argv[]) {


     char *str = malloc(50);
     char *tmp;
     char *tmp2;

     int i=0;


     while( i < (argc-1)) {
          tmp = hex_str[*(argv[i]) & l_word];
          tmp2 = hex_str[*(argv[i]) & u_word];

          if(i == 0) { memcpy(str,tmp2,1); strcat(str,tmp);}
          else { strcat(str,tmp2); strcat(str,tmp);}
          i++;
    }

    printf("\n*********  %s  *************** \n", str);

}
share|improve this answer

I'll add the C++ version here for anyone who is interested.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
inline void print_bytes(char const * buffer, std::size_t count, std::size_t bytes_per_line, std::ostream & out) {
    std::ios::fmtflags flags(out.flags()); // Save flags before manipulation.
    out << std::hex << std::setfill('0');
    out.setf(std::ios::uppercase);
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
        auto current_byte_number = static_cast<unsigned int>(static_cast<unsigned char>(buffer[i]));
        out << std::setw(2) << current_byte_number;
        bool is_end_of_line = (bytes_per_line != 0) && ((i + 1 == count) || ((i + 1) % bytes_per_line == 0));
        out << (is_end_of_line ? '\n' : ' ');
    }
    out.flush();
    out.flags(flags); // Restore original flags.
}

It will print the hexdump of the buffer of length count to std::ostream out (you can make it default to std::cout). Every line will contain bytes_per_line bytes, each byte is represented using uppercase two digit hex. There will be a space between bytes. And at end of line or end of buffer it will print a newline. If bytes_per_line is set to 0, then it will not print new_line. Try for yourself.

share|improve this answer

What complex solutions!
Malloc and sprints and casts oh my. (OZ quote)
and not a single rem anywhere. Gosh

How about something like this?

main()
{
    // the value
    int value = 16;

    // create a string array with a '\0' ending ie. 0,0,0
    char hex[]= {0,0,'\0'}; 
    char *hex_p=hex;

    //a working variable
    int TEMP_int=0;

    // get me how many 16s are in this code
    TEMP_int=value/16;

    // load the first character up with 
    // 48+0 gives you ascii 0, 55+10 gives you ascii A
    if (TEMP_int<10) {*hex_p=48+TEMP_int;}
        else {*hex_p=55+TEMP_int;}

    // move that pointer to the next (less significant byte)<BR>
    hex_p++;

    // get me the remainder after I have divied by 16
    TEMP_int=value%16;

    // 48+0 gives you ascii 0, 55+10 gives you ascii A
    if (TEMP_int<10) {*hex_p=48+TEMP_int;}
        else {*hex_p=55+TEMP_int;}

    // print the result
    printf("%i , 0x%s",value,hex);

}
share|improve this answer

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