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Timeout expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to obtaining a connection from the pool. This may have occurred because all pooled connections were in use and max pool size was reached.

This is the first ASP.net site I developed a long time ago, it has this code at the top of a lot of pages (and in a lot of methods).

cn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["LocalSqlServer"].ToString());
cn.Open();

A lot of pages don't have:

cn.Close();

Also none of the pages do using(SqlConnection...), (although all the data readers are in using blocks).

First question is, is the the primary candiate for the error?

Second question is, is the best way to solve this refactoring/manually searching for unclosed connections? I know it's an ugly hack, but the time spent refactoring will be huge, but can we set a scheduled task to recycle the connection pool once a day at 3am or something?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, that is the primary cause of the error. Currently, many of those connections will wait until the next GC to re-pool the underlying connection. You will exhaust the pool (and database connections) pretty quickly.

The best way of refactoring this is to add the missing using, such that the connection is scoped. Personally I'd also refactor that to a single method, i.e.

using(var cn = SomeUtilityClass.GetOpenConnection())
{...}

Closing the reader does little unless the reader is marked to close the connection; and having the data-reader close the connection (via a behaviour) sort of works, but it assumes you get as far as consuming the reader - it won't necessarily behave well in error scenarios.

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Thanks Marc, the design is particularly bad as the connection variable is passed into other methods, will this matter much? –  Tom Gullen Jun 15 '11 at 12:01
    
@Tom as long as they make use of the connection and are done with it, not at all. Your using block will need to encapsulate those methods, obviously. –  Marc Gravell Jun 15 '11 at 12:05

Even I have encountered this error in the application that I once worked on. The problem that I identified was the same - no using statements and no close calls.

I would advise you to search the whole project for SqlConnection and then include the SqlConnection, SqlCommand and SqlDataAdapter in using statements and also do a connection.close within the sqlconnection using statement. Together with this in the config file increase the timeout of the connection within the connection string. You can also you CommandTimeout property of SqlCommand.

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1  
if the pool is saturated, extending the timeout just means more requests get queued while it waits. It does nothing to fix the issue, and only harms the web-server. Having most of the threads blocking on a pool that is dry could also delay GC, exacerbating an already doomed scenario. Or the tl;dr; version: don't extend the timeout. –  Marc Gravell Jun 15 '11 at 12:04
    
Thanks @Marc Gravell, for the nice piece of advise –  Hasan Fahim Jun 15 '11 at 12:11

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