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I'm using NUnit and apply on some of my test the category attribute:

[Category("FastTest")]

These are tests that must run very fast ,less than 10 seconds. so I also decorate them with

[Timeout(10000)]

And now the question:

How can I do that every time I decorate a method with [Category("FastTest")] behind the scenes it will be decorated automatically with [Timeout(1000)] ?

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5 Answers 5

Create a Resharper live-template that spits out both attributes when writing "catfast" for example. Or buy PostSharp and let postshart AOP-adorn all methods which are marked with the specified category.

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Both of those solutions require the purchase of third party tools when you can just implement your own attribute. –  feanz Jun 15 '11 at 12:29
3  
I would not implement my own attribute if I already have one of the mentioned third party tools. From my point of view, Visual Studio is an addin to Resharper, not the other way around :-) –  Marius Jun 15 '11 at 12:33
2  
I agree with Marius that Resharper is worth the money (and I really like the way he said it), but you could also implement this using code snippets built into visual studio if you cannot get the budget for external tools. –  Mike Two Jun 15 '11 at 12:41
    
Yeah except visual studio works without resharper not the other way around. –  feanz Jun 15 '11 at 12:41
1  
The Community Edition of PostSharp is free. –  TrueWill Jun 15 '11 at 13:37

I don't think it's very good idea.

  1. Category attribute used for grouping tests, not for setting tests expectations.
  2. How will other developer know, that tests from group "FastTest" should run within 10 seconds? Why not 2 seconds? Or maybe 100 milliseconds?
  3. You will stuck with fixed timeout for all tests in category. How to set one test for 2 seconds, other for 10 seconds?
  4. You will not save much time doing this.

Of course you can do it. AOP. Reflection. But simplest way - group all fast tests in one test fixture and decorate it with [Timeout] attribute.

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If this is a large enterprise/modularized application, I would not put all these tests into the same fixture. I want to put tests togheter based on their namespace/project location, not based on them having a common attribute like "needs to run fast". –  Marius Jun 15 '11 at 12:59
1  
Then I'd prefer two attributes - Category and Timeout. Because it's not obvious how fast tests exactly should be. 10 minutes or 10 seconds, or 10 milliseconds. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 15 '11 at 14:00

I understand what you mean/need but I don't think is possible. Are you expecting the IDE to add another attribute when you add one or nUnit to know what a category is and apply certain extra attributes for tests of certain categories?

Sounds like a good idea but in case sounds more like nUnit configuration rather than pure c# attribute chaining which I am not aware of if exists.

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Create a custom attribute FastTest that inherites from TimeoutAttribute. This attribute would then implment its own Category naming convention. Something like this should work

public class FastTestAttribyte :TimeoutAttribute
{
    protected string categoryName;

    public FastTestAttribyte (int timeout):base(timeout)
   {
       categoryName = "FastTest";
   }

    public string Name { get return categoryName; }
}

Edit

It will work if you decompile the attribute this is what it does

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Assembly, AllowMultiple=true, Inherited=true)]
public class CategoryAttribute : Attribute
{
    // Fields
    protected string categoryName;

    // Methods
    protected CategoryAttribute()
    {
        this.categoryName = base.GetType().Name;
        if (this.categoryName.EndsWith("Attribute"))
        {
            this.categoryName = this.categoryName.Substring(0, this.categoryName.Length - 9);
        }
    }

    public CategoryAttribute(string name)
    {
        this.categoryName = name.Trim();
    }

    // Properties
    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return this.categoryName;
        }
    }
}

I think Nunit will use reflection to Name property of the atttribute.

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3  
but this attribute will behave as TimeoutAttribute only, even adding such cat name, nunit UI will not understand it has to use Name as category I guess.... or am I wrong?! –  Davide Piras Jun 15 '11 at 12:13
    
@Davide Piras Should not be an issue see edit. –  feanz Jun 15 '11 at 12:28
1  
How will NUnit see that you want your FastTestAttribyte (sic) to act as a CategoryAttribute? You decompiled the code for CategoryAttribute but you have not looked at how NUnit looks at it. Having a Name property is not enough. NUnit needs to know you intend for that attribute to represent a category. It does that by looking for the CategoryAttribute on a method or class. –  Mike Two Jun 15 '11 at 12:35
    
@feans, it is not about how NUnit can extract Name property of your attribute. I doubt NUnit will even consider looking into your own attributes, probably it has code like this: var categoryAttributes = testMethodInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(CategoryAttribute)). Such code will never find your attributes –  Snowbear Jun 15 '11 at 12:38
    
That's true but what are you going to be using the category for? With the custom attribute above the TestReult xml will output a property on your test with a name FastTest allowing you to do your own categorization. –  feanz Jun 15 '11 at 13:03

Visual Studio allows you to create custom code snippets, which are similar to the Resharper templates Marius mentions, but doesn't cost anything to make.

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