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I`m learning CSS and HTML. In my code I have:

<style>
table, td, th
{
padding: 5px;
}
</style>

This rule works on all tables on the page. Now I want to make a table without padding: Here is the source:

 <table>

  <tr>
   <td>Login</td>
   <td><input type="text" name="login" class="input"></td>
  </tr>

  <tr>
   <td>Password</td>
   <td><input type="password" name="password" class="input"></tr>
  </tr>

 </table>

How to do this? Thanks in advance.

P.S: I`m from Russia, so sorry for bad English

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to add specific styles to this table that override the default styles you've defined, then you'll need some way to reference it in CSS.

Typically, you would give it a class or an ID -- eg <table class='myspecialtable'>....</table>

Then you can have a stylesheet which overrides your default 5px styles, just for this table.

.myspecialtable, .myspecialtable td, .myspecialtable th {
    padding: 0px;
}

If you can't add an ID or class to this table, then you could add it on a parent element, and the effect would be the same (as long as that parent doesn't contain any other tables, of course). In this case, your CSS would look something like this:

.myspecialtablecontainer table, .myspecialtablecontainer td, .myspecialtablecontainer th {
    padding: 0px;
}
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Thanks, it works! –  Anton Jun 15 '11 at 12:56

You should change your CSS to define a style instead.

.padded { ... }

Then you can set the class to that style for any tables you want to use that style.

<table class="padded">
</table>

When you set a style, as you have done, for all elements of a particular type, then the only way to remove them is to set the style to something else, or not include a reference to that CSS file from the page that you don't want to use them.

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Should be .padded { ... } for classes –  locrizak Jun 15 '11 at 12:52
1  
#padded means you need to use id="padded" –  James Allardice Jun 15 '11 at 12:53
    
.padded { ... } would define a class. #padded would only apply the style to a table with id="padded" –  Matt.C Jun 15 '11 at 12:53
    
Whoops. Typo corrected. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 15 '11 at 12:54

One way would be to give your table a class like so:

<table class="nopadding">
 [... table rows and columns...]
</table>

And then put this in your css:

.nopadding, .nopadding td, .nopadding th
{
  padding: 0;
}

Which says "any element with the class should have a padding of 0". The .nopadding th and .nopadding td has to be there and is a way of saying "all th and td who is inside an element of class nopadding shouldn't have any padding either", since you previously told all th and td to have a padding of 5px.

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Simple use table, td, th { padding: 0px; }

Also try border-collapse: collapse;.

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I remeber when I first started learning HTML.

What you're after is an id or a class attribute. You'd have two tables like so:

<table class="table1">

  <tr>
   <td>Login</td>
   <td><input type="text" name="login" class="input"></td>
  </tr>

  <tr>
   <td>Password</td>
   <td><input type="password" name="password" class="input"></tr>
  </tr>

 </table>

<table class="table2">

  <tr>
   <td>Login</td>
   <td><input type="text" name="login" class="input"></td>
  </tr>

  <tr>
   <td>Password</td>
   <td><input type="password" name="password" class="input"></tr>
  </tr>

 </table>

To make is so that table1 had padding, but table2 didn't, you would use the appropriate CSS rules to identify and style the tables:

.table1, .table1 td, .table1 th
{
padding: 5px;
}

.table2, .table2 td, .table2 th
{
padding: 0px;
}

There's many ways I could have done this with CSS. For example, You could also use ids in this case, but it's easier to use classes as an id can only be used once per document.

A slightly better approach in this case would be to take advantage of cascading rules. I could have kept your original CSS and just added the second set of rules:

.table, .table td, .table th
{
padding: 5px;
}

.table2, .table2 td, .table2 th
{
padding: 0px;
}

In this case, only tables with the class table2 would have the 0px padding - all other tables would have 5px padding.

It would be a good idea to read the W3CSchools introduction to CSS - http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_intro.asp. This will introduce you to the basics and get you on your way.

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<table cellpadding='0'> If this don't work, you can create a css class that removes the padding and use that in your table: <table class='no_padding'>

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