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I'm having an issue using a class I've created as the base class for library symbols:

I've created a class AvSkin which will act as the display for an instance of AvChild. It looks like this:

package avian.environment.skins
{
    import flash.display.DisplayObject;

    /**
     * @author Marty Wallace
     * @version 1.0.0
     */
    public class AvSkin extends DisplayObject
    {
        /**
         * Getters
         */
        public function get top():Number{ return y - height/2; }
        public function get left():Number{ return x - width/2; }
        public function get bottom():Number{ return y + height/2; }
        public function get right():Number{ return x + width/2; }
    }
}

Obviously doesn't do a lot, but the point is that I can add to it later on (ie a render() method).

Problem is, because this extends DisplayObject (so that I can make the skin a TextField, SimpleButton, Shape, etc) and not MovieClip, it throws this error if I set it as the base class for a library symbol:

5000: The class 'avian.environment.skins.AvSkin' must subclass 'flash.display.MovieClip' since it is linked to a library symbol of that type.

Is there a way around this? I don't want to do either of the following:

  1. Make AvSkin extend MovieClip.
  2. Create a class for my library symbol that extends AvSkin.

See here for a detailed representation of what extends DisplayObject, which might help back the reasoning behind my question.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm is it possible instead of NOT extending MovieClip, you wish to extend ALL of the common DisplayObject subclasses? Like... some sort of multiple inheritance? –  bigp Jun 15 '11 at 13:14
    
I could create multiple types of skins ie AvMovieClipSkin, AvBitmapSkin etc, but I wouldn't be able to extend a common skin class and thus would have to repeat the above logic in each. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:26
    
Actually, there is a way around it. If you use the "include" keyword in each of your derived classes, and point it to one common ActionScript file (basically a portion of a class rather than a whole declaration), you can have your code centralized in one place so updates and additional features are easy to add across all types. –  bigp Jun 15 '11 at 13:31
    
That's a good idea, but seems like sloppy OOP to me. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:32
    
Well sloppy OOP yes, but this is a specific situation where it can be beneficial. And it depends how frequently you would have to update or modify the code. I've had experience with it - and sure enough it's awful to debug when first starting, but once everything is stable it's quite great. –  bigp Jun 15 '11 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Library symbols have a given type, i.e. MovieClip or Sprite and so on. If you want to inherit from these, you have to use this as base class. There is no workaround for this, it's an OOP paradigm for languages which do not support multiple inheritance, which AS3 is. You can't extend something in the middle of an inheritance tree.

For your task you could have an Interface. But you have to implement this interface in all your derived classes. But the implementation logic could be out sourced in a static class to ensure maintainability.

interface IAvSkin 
{
    function get top():Number;
    function get left():Number;
    function get bottom():Number;
    function get right():Number;
}

public class AvSkin
{
    public static function getTop(obj:DisplayObject):Number
    {
        return obj.y - obj.height/2;
    }

    // and so on
}

public class AvSkinMovieClip extends MovieClip implements IAvSkin
{
    public function get top():Number{ return AvSkin.getTop(this); }
    // and so on
}

public class AvSkinMovieClip extends Sprite implements IAvSkin
{
    public function get top():Number{ return AvSkin.getTop(this); }
    // and so on
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach. Not a fan of the static namespace though. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:15
    
You could also have a non static helper new AvHelper(this).getTop() but creation of objects for this task takes unnecessary memory and execution time. –  DanielB Jun 15 '11 at 13:18
    
You'd also have to redefine the getters/other methods in each of the classes implementing IAvSkin which isn't appealing. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:28
    
This answer is looking pretty good now; I do have one question though: Is there an advantage (other than readability) to defining my getters within an interface rather than just recreating the methods in each of the classes that implement it (which you have to do pretty much anyway)? –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:39
    
If you are implementing the interface your are sure, these getters exists on an object. You can use the type IAvSkin instead of DisplayObject, Sprite or MovieClip in your code. You could cast an object to IAvSkin and if this cast is successful, you know there is the getter implementation. –  DanielB Jun 15 '11 at 14:14

How about extending Sprite? That is one of the most barebones DisplayObject subclass that won't have most of the MovieClip functionalities.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the skin were to be a Bitmap, Shape or Video? –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:17
    
True! Wasn't sure you'd need those :( –  bigp Jun 15 '11 at 13:33
    
Ah, sorry. I've added a link to the types of things that could be an AvSkin (everything under DisplayObject). Should have added that clarification to begin with. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 13:35

How about just using composition? You can instantiate the AvSkin and send the class you want to extend into it:

package avian.environment.skins
{
    import flash.display.DisplayObject;

    /**
     * @author Marty Wallace
     * @version 1.0.0
     */
    public class AvSkin extends DisplayObject
    {
        protected var _component:DisplayObject;

        public function AvSkin(component:DisplayObject) {
            addChild(_component = component);
        }
        /**
         * Getters
         */
        public function get top():Number{ return y - height/2; }
        public function get left():Number{ return x - width/2; }
        public function get bottom():Number{ return y + height/2; }
        public function get right():Number{ return x + width/2; }
    }
}

and use it like this:

var skin:AvSkin = new AvSkin(new MyMovieClip());

Now you can superclass it as much as you'd like.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like you're typecasting which doesn't need so much work in the class itself to begin with. This also won't solve my issue which is linking library symbols to use AvSkin as a base class. Thanks for giving it a go for me. –  Marty Jun 15 '11 at 21:17
    
Yeah you won't be able to linkage directly with that class. If you're dragging items onto the stage using the Flash IDE this won't help, but if you're instantiating from code there's not that much difference wrapping it as a parameter. –  Flassari Jun 16 '11 at 13:09

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