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EDIT: Okay, so I'm at a bit of a loss here. Actually, at a lot of a loss. I'm seriously considering growing a personal hatred for CSS and its counter-intuitiveness.

So I was trying to make a 3-column layout. It used to be based on the Holy Grail layout, but then I decided I don't need the fluidity or the equal column heights, and began modifying the CSS to better suit my needs.

First, the text in the center column, instead of wrapping, kept stretching the middle column, moving it under the left column. I implemented @ZincX's suggestion of using fixed width columns (see his post below). This fixed the columns, but the containers around them didn't stretch with them. If you open my site (see link below), there's an entire footer hidden behind the header.

Also, I decided to do hierarchic markup - I moved the header to the bottom of the source code, and put it on top with absolute positioning. I'll probably do this with the left navigation column as soon as I get this sorted out. For those unfamiliar with the practice, I only learned about it the other day, too - putting your important content on the top of the page makes it a bit more search engine-friendly.

So how can this huge mess of a layout be fixed? I just want a simple "header, three columns, footer" layout. Is giving absolute positions in pixels even a good practice that displays well in most browsers?

Here's the site I'm working on.
And here's my stylesheet.

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@Egasimus - are you looking to make a website with a header, three columns (the left and right taking up as much width as they need and the middle taking up the remaining space) and then a footer? –  My Head Hurts Jun 15 '11 at 15:06
    
Well, I'm not sure if I'd put it that way - but the left and right columns would be fixed width (160px or so), and the middle column would indeed take up all the remaining space. The entire layout would take up 90% of the viewport (min-width: 600px; max-width: 900px), and would preferably be centered. I'm feeling quite frustrated about not being able to solve what's supposed to be a fairly easy problem... –  egasimus Jun 15 '11 at 15:36
    
I think I'm giving up on using position: absolute - absolute divs are taken out of the flow and, unlike floats, it seems there's no way to make the container enclose them... –  egasimus Jun 16 '11 at 6:52
    
Don't worry - CSS can get really frustrating sometimes - and believe it or not, the things that appear simple are not always as easy as you would expect. I think you are on the right lines getting rid of the position:absolute attribute and using float instead. Absolute positioning is great, but shouldn't be used as part of a layout - it is more of a styling technique to provide effects (in my opinion anyway). –  My Head Hurts Jun 16 '11 at 10:35
1  
@Egasimus - I'm not sure if you are happy to start the layout of your page from scratch and then re-add the content - but if you are, try out this link –  My Head Hurts Jun 16 '11 at 11:04

3 Answers 3

What you need is a fixed width left column and fixed width right column and a middle column with left and right margin.

The way to do this is as follows:

#col_left {
    display: block;
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    bottom:0;
    width:200px;
}

#col_right {
    display: block;
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    right:0;
    bottom:0;
    width: 200px;
}
#col_middle {
    display: block;
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    right:0;
    bottom:0;
    right:0;
    margin-left:200px;
    margin-right:200px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll try this. Looking at it, it seems it'll coincidentally also help with another problem of mine... –  egasimus Jun 15 '11 at 13:42
    
I tried it, and it partially works - but the container div doesn't stretch with the columns, and the footer appears on top, too. (Check out the first link in my original post - it's currently up there) –  egasimus Jun 15 '11 at 13:56
    
You probably need to put the container div into the col_middle. The footer will need to have an absolute postion too. If the footer has a height of X, then each column will need to have bottom: X. –  Steve Walsh Jun 15 '11 at 14:06
    
I'm going back to tables. –  egasimus Jun 15 '11 at 14:11

I'm not sure if I'm understanding your question completely, but test out this example code and see if it accomplishes what you are aiming to do (I played with it a lot so there may be parts of the CSS that aren't needed):

CSS:

* { margin:0; padding:0; border:none; }
#header {
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    height:75px;
    background-color:#666666;
}

#belowHeader {
    position:absolute;
    top:75px;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    height:auto;
    min-width:604px;
    text-align:center;
}

#colLeft {
    height:auto;
    min-height:100px;
    float:left;
    width:200px;
    background-color:#888888;
}
#colMiddle {
    height:auto;
    min-height:150px;
    width:200px;
    display:inline-block;
    background-color:#999999;
}
#colRight {
    float:right;
    height:auto;
    min-height:100px;
    width:200px;
    background-color:#888888;
}

#footer {
    position:absolute;
    bottom:-75px;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    height:75px;
    background-color:#666666;
}

HTML Body:

<div id="header"></div>
<div id="belowHeader">
    <div id="colLeft"></div>
    <div id="colMiddle"></div>
    <div id="colRight"></div>
    <div id="footer"></div>
</div>

I'm pretty sure the min-width and min-height properties wont work on IE6, but it's a start. If you aren't afraid of breaking IE6 or 7, you could use display:table and display:table-cell instead of using actual tables.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks (: Your suggestion suffered the same problem, though - the center column stretched instead of wrapping. –  egasimus Jun 16 '11 at 10:43
    
@egasimus I'm not quite sure what you mean by wrapping. Are you saying that you want text in the center div to go underneath the left and right columns when they are smaller in height? –  BDawg Jun 16 '11 at 12:26
    
@egasimus Ahh, I just tested it out in IE and it has a problem with not containing text in the center div, is that what you mean? –  BDawg Jun 16 '11 at 12:45
    
Yes, and it does it in Opera, too. –  egasimus Jun 17 '11 at 5:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have successfully converted Soh Tanaka's Layout into a 3-column one. It's not perfect - it seems that, with CSS, nothing can be - but it's a start.

My version is a bit of a mess, but it's can easily be a start for someone trying to do this sort of thing. And here's a version with the left/right columns swapped.

Mind the DOCTYPE - if it's HTML 4.01, it might need to be changed to XHTML Transitional; otherwise, the layout might not work in IE. Or perhaps it might.

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