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#pragma omp parallel
{
    int x; // private to each thread ?
}

#pragma omp parallel for
for (int i=0; i<1000; ++i)
{
    int x; // private to each thread ?
}

Thank you!

P.S. If local variables are automatically private, what is the point of using private clause?

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1  
Yes, they're automatically private –  Eamorr Jun 15 '11 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

P.S. If local variables are automatically private, what is the point of using private clause?

The point is presumably that in earlier versions of C you needed to declare all variables at the beginning of the function, and this is still the prevailing style.

That is, code such as this:

#pragma omp parallel
{
    int x;
}

is the preferred way in C++. But in some versions of C you cannot use this code, you need to use the private clause.

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Your answer is incorrect. That's perfectly valid C89 code. The point of private is so that you don't have to change your code. –  Z boson May 4 at 9:09
    
@Zboson Hence why I said “earlier versions”. –  Konrad Rudolph May 4 at 11:58
    
What earlier versions are you referring then? C89 does not allow mixed declarations but you example is not a mixed declaration because int is declared at the start of your statement block. Are you saying that pre C89 that you can't do {int x; {int y; }}? –  Z boson May 4 at 12:03

The reason for the private clause is so that you don't have to change your code.

The only way to parallelize the following code without the private cause

int i,j;
#pragma omp parallel for private(j)
for(i=0; i<n; i++) {
    for(j=0; j<n; j++) {
        //do something
    }
}

is to change the code. For example like this

int i
#pragma omp parallel for
for(i=0; i<n; i++) {
    int j;
    for(j=0; j<n; j++) {
        //do something
    }
}

That's perfectly valid C89/C90 code but one of the goals of OpenMP is not have to change your code except to add pragma statements which can be enabled or disabled at compile time.

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This is the actual answer to the question. –  emsr May 17 at 15:39
    
@emsr, I have a PhD from UMD in physics as well (particle physics). I know/knew many of the faculty in the nuclear group. If I may ask, what year did you get your PhD? –  Z boson May 18 at 7:42
    
@Z boson I graduated in 1996. Tom Cohen was my advisor. I was there for a good while - 1986-96 with much of the last four years part-time. –  emsr May 18 at 19:50

The data within a parallel region is private to each thread.

Kindly refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenMP#Data_sharing_attribute_clauses [Data sharing attribute clauses]

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1  
I think OpenMP clauses are applied to variables declared outside the parallel region. My question is related to local variables. –  pic11 Jun 15 '11 at 20:20

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