Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a functional difference between these two nested usages of unnamed namespaces:

namespace A { namespace {
  void foo() {/*...*/}
}}

and

namespace { namespace A {
  void foo() {/*...*/}
}}}

As far as I see it, both foos will get an internal unique identifier per compilation unit and can be accessed with A::foo - but is there a subtle or not-so-subtle difference that I'm not seeing?

share|improve this question
1  
(edited) You can effectively hide the second foo by declaring another A::foo at the file level. The first foo will be always accessible as ::A::foo. Unless you reopen A and declare another foo there. That is, yes, pretty much the same. –  n.m. Jun 15 '11 at 13:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Exactly as you typed, there is no difference.

You can, of course, add declarations in the first level of namespace to booth examples and then it will be a difference.

namespace A {
  int i;         // Accessed globally in this file as "A::i".
  namespace {
    void foo() {/*...*/}
}}


namespace {
  int i;         // Accessed globally in this file simply as "i".
  namespace A {
    void foo() {/*...*/}
}}}

Note that, although you programmer have no way to distinguish, for the compiler, the namespaces are distinct:

unnamed_namespaces.cpp:42:5: error: reference to ‘A’ is ambiguous
unnamed_namespaces.cpp:19:17: error: candidates are: namespace A { }
unnamed_namespaces.cpp:28:19: error:                 namespace <unnamed>::A { }

Usefull:


EDIT:

In respect to ADL (Argument-dependent name lookup), I understand that it will be no precedence difference in overload resolution for other foo() as below:

#include    <iostream>

void foo() { std::cout << "::foo()" << std::endl; }

namespace A {
    namespace {
        void foo() { std::cout << "A::<unnamed>::foo()" << std::endl; }

        class   AClass
        {
        public:
            AClass( )
            {   foo( ); }
        };
    }
}


namespace {
    namespace B {
        void foo() { std::cout << "B::<unnamed>::foo()" << std::endl; }

        using namespace A;

        class   BClass
        {
        public:
            BClass( )
            {   foo( ); }

            ~BClass( )
            {   A::foo( );  }
        };
    }
}

int main( )
{
    A::foo( );
    B::foo( );
    foo( );

    A::AClass   a;
    B::BClass   b;

    return  0;
}

Compiler will prefer the closest foo( ) unless explicitly specified. So BClass constructor calls B::foo( ) even having a using namespace A on it. To call A::foo( ) on BClass destructor, the call must be explicitly qualified.

A::<unnamed>::foo()
B::<unnamed>::foo()
::foo()
A::<unnamed>::foo()
B::<unnamed>::foo()
A::<unnamed>::foo()

Maybe it become clearer if we think in nested named namespaces and how the argument-dependent will be solved. The olny difference will be an implicit using on the unnamed ones, but it won't change the compiler preference.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think your access example is backwards. The first one is A::i and the second is just i. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 15 '11 at 21:06
    
Thanks Dennis. I corrected that. –  fljx Jun 16 '11 at 17:57
    
While this is a superb answer so far, I was wondering what kinds of effects the namespaces can have on ADL - will namespace A {void bar();} be able able to find foo () in any of the examples? –  ltjax Jun 17 '11 at 9:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.