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Does anyone know if/when Internet Explorer will support the "border-radius" CSS attribute?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 201 down vote accepted

Yes! When IE9 is released in Jan 2011.

Let's say you want an even 15px on all four sides:

.myclass {
 border-style: solid;
 border-width: 2px;
 -moz-border-radius: 15px;
 -webkit-border-radius: 15px;
 border-radius: 15px;
}

IE9 will use the default border-radius, so just make sure you include that in all your styles calling a border radius. Then your site will be ready for IE9.

-moz-border-radius is for Firefox, -webkit-border-radius is for Safari and Chrome.

Furthermore: don't forget to declare your IE coding is ie9:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=9" />

Some lazy developers have <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7" />. If that tag exists, border-radius will never work in IE.

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7  
Presumably if you're not using the X-UA-Compatible meta tag you don't need to add it just to make it work in IE9? –  thepeer Sep 30 '10 at 16:06
64  
You should be putting the vendor prefix versions FIRST and the standard LAST so that if the browser supports the actual standard then it will use that instead of it's vendor prefixed version. –  Jason Berry Oct 8 '10 at 5:56
4  
Correct you don't need the meta tag.. you only need to replace the ie7 emulator if it is included. Otherwise, don't worry about it. –  Kevin Florida Oct 12 '10 at 14:20
3  
FYI in the current IE9 beta 'border-radius' works properly using a single value. All four values are not required unless you actually want them to be different. –  mikemaccana Dec 3 '10 at 23:58
2  
@nailer: Thanks for updating the corners.. The first alpha vs and beta vs of IE9 required all 4 corners declared. I just downloaded the latest ie9 RC and it is letting me declare one value.. Not sure when that changed.. –  Kevin Florida Feb 11 '11 at 22:26

The answer to this question has changed since it was asked a year ago. (This question is currently one of the top results for Googling "border-radius ie".)

IE9 will support border-radius.

There is a platform preview available which supports border-radius. You will need Windows Vista or Windows 7 to run the preview (and IE9 when it is released).

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While you're waiting.. Curved corner (border-radius) cross browser

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A workaround and a handy tool:

CSS3Pie uses .htc files and the behavior property to implement CSS3 into IE 6 - 8.

Modernizr is a bit of javascript that will put classes on your html element, allowing you to serve different style definitions to different browsers based on their capabilities.

Obviously, these both add more overhead, but with IE9 due to only run on Vista/7 we might be stuck for quite awhile. As of August 2010 Windows XP still accounts for 48% of web client OSes.

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2  
CSS3 PIE was by far the easiest and least intrusive option for this. –  Chris Rasco Aug 19 '11 at 19:04

It is not planned for IE8. See the CSS Compatibility page.

Beyond that no plans have been released. Rumors exist that IE8 will be the last version for Windows XP

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10  
You are obviously wrong, because IE9 is supposed to support CSS3 too, and I dont see IE dying anywhere. Someone pls kill IE –  Starx Jul 8 '10 at 7:02
9  
Turns out that IE8 is the last version... for Windows XP. –  M. Dudley Apr 21 '11 at 19:05

Quick update to this question, IE9 will support border-radius according to: http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2009/11/18/an-early-look-at-ie9-for-developers.aspx

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<!DOCTYPE html> without this tag border-radius doesn't works in IE9, no need of meta tags.

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The corner radius issue of IE gonna solve.

http://kbala.com/ie-9-supports-corner-radius/

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What about support for border radius AND background gradient. Yes IE9 is to support them both seperately but if you mix the two the gradient bleeds out of the rounded corner. Below is a link to a poor example but i have seen it in my own testing as well. Should of taken a screen shot :(

Maybe the real question is when will IE support CSS standards without MS-FILTER proprietary hacks.

http://frugalcoder.us/post/2010/09/15/ie9-corner-plus-gradient-fail.aspx

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IE10 will support proper CSS3 gradients (the current IE10 developer preview already does via -ms-linear-gradient). If you want gradients that honor border-radius in IE9, you need to use SVG (either an external SVG file or one that's encoded in a data URI) - see css3wizardry.com/2010/10/29/css-gradients-for-ie9 -- also CSS3 PIE will soon automate this, there is a testing build available –  lojjic Jun 24 '11 at 15:29
    
A quick fix is to wrap it in another element. Give the parent element the same border-radius and set its overflow to hidden. –  Senne Nov 17 '11 at 9:37

Use -ms-border-radius: 15px, any element that uses css -ms- is compatible with IE.

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not work pls check –  HTML Developer Nov 14 '13 at 10:29
    
yeah it doesn´t work, I hate IE –  Marabunta Jan 8 at 19:05

SOLVED - not rendering border radius correctly in IE 10 and 11

For those not getting the -ms-border-radius: or the border-radius: to work in IE 10,11 And it renders all square then follow these steps:

  1. Click on the gear wheel at the top right of the IE browser
  2. Click on Compatibility view settings
  3. Now uncheck the 2 boxes that are checked by default.

Ensure that the boxes are unchecked as in pic

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protected by sarnold Mar 12 '12 at 9:44

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