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I want to make an inner class a friend of an unrelated class but this doesn't seem to work (at least in gcc 4.1.2):

class A {
    int i;
    friend class B; // fine
    friend class B::C; // not allowed?
};

class B {
    int geti(A* ap) { return ap->i; }

    class C {
        int geti(A* ap) { return ap->i; }
    };
};
share|improve this question
1  
Lots of basic errors in your code, please fix those first: no "B::C::geta()", "A::i" is private. "B::C::geti()" is private. –  Kerrek SB Jun 15 '11 at 13:48
    
Just ignore the main function. –  dave Jun 15 '11 at 13:50
5  
"Just ignore the main function." Incredible. Did it work when you told the linker that? –  Cody Gray Jun 15 '11 at 13:53
    
OK - but next time go the extra step and make+test an example that has shows nothing but the problem in question. And remember to "accept" answers eventually for good karma :-) –  Kerrek SB Jun 15 '11 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

You have to declare B::C before using it. The following might work.

Update: Ignoring a usable demonstration as requested, here's a way of structuring this (minus the definitions of member functions) that could work, but bear in mind that everything is private as it stands.

class A;

class B
{
  int geti(A * ap);

public:
  class C
  {
    int geti(A * ap);
  };
};

class A
{
  friend class B;    // fine
  friend class B::C; // fine too
  int i;
};

Then define the getter functions elsewhere:

int B::geti(A * ap) { ... }
int B::C::geti(A * ap) { ... }

Alternative: forward-declare the nested class B::C and save one external definition:

class A;

class B
{
  int geti(const A * ap) const; // we cannot use A yet!

public:
  class C;
};

class A
{
  friend class B;    // fine
  friend class B::C; // fine too
  int i;
};

int B::geti(const A * ap) const { return ap->i; }

class B::C
{
  inline int geti(const A * ap) const { return ap->i; }
};
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OK that works, thanks, but is there really no way of declaring B::C by just doing class B::C; in the same way we can do class B; to declare B? Having to put the getters elsewhere is annoying. –  dave Jun 15 '11 at 13:56
    
I posted an alternative, but I don't know if that's better. –  Kerrek SB Jun 15 '11 at 14:01
4  
@dave - No, you cannot declare nested names like that. In class B::C is B a class or a namespace? –  Bo Persson Jun 15 '11 at 14:10
    
@BoPersson: Either it is declared, or it isn't either. Unfortunately it is not allowed even if you say class B; class B::C. C++ does not allow forward-declaring member without defining the containing class. –  Jan Hudec Aug 7 '13 at 9:19

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