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Im trying to set up a variable and pass it constructor function essentailly like an anonymous type in c# but javascript doesnt seem to like it...

var aPerson = function Person(){

};


$(document).ready(function(){

  Person.prototype.age = 22;

  window.alert(aPerson .age);

});

Why cant I do this?

share|improve this question
3  
This code looks awfully familiar... – Pat Jun 15 '11 at 14:35
1  
possible duplicate of Why doesn't this edit to a prototype work? – Daniel A. White Jun 15 '11 at 14:36
1  
Oh please, don't ask the same question twice! – Marcel Korpel Jun 15 '11 at 14:37
    
sorry guys the question is actually different but similar...not sure if I should just roll into one question but that sort of doesnt get to the point.... – Exitos Jun 15 '11 at 14:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Person is only declared as part of your aPerson variable, but it needs to be defined explicitly (e.g. function Person(){}) before it can be used for prototypical inheritance. You need something more like this:

// Create a Person function object
function Person() {

};

// Modify that function's prototype
Person.prototype.age = 22;

$(document).ready(function() {
  // aPerson.__proto__ = Person.prototype
  var aPerson = new Person();

  // JS checks whether aPerson has age already set, if not, it checks
  // aPerson's prototype -- in which case it's given the value 22
  alert(aPerson.age);
});

Here's the deal: the property prototype works together with new by copying the prototype reference to the object (you can see what that entails by running console.dir(aPerson) in Chrome console, for example). JavaScript checks the original object itself first, then prototype to see whether a function or property exists. That means you can change the reference prototype age later and see the changes reflected in the original object. Also, you can declare your own age in the original object itself and have that override the prototype.

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I'm quite certain you have to reference your function using aPerson rather than Person (externally). Internally, you'd reference it using Person.

Alternatively, you could do this -

function Person() {

}

var aPerson = new Person();

$(function() {
  Person.prototype.age = 22;
  alert(aPerson.age) //22
});
share|improve this answer

because aPerson doesn't have an age. You will have to call new for it to work.

var aPerson = function Person(){

};


$(document).ready(function(){

  Person.prototype.age = 22;
  bPerson = new Person();


  window.alert(bPerson.age);

});
share|improve this answer
    
but ive added age to the prototype of the Person class doesnt that mean that all objects will get the age? – Exitos Jun 15 '11 at 14:32
1  
Mind that bPerson is a global variable. – Marcel Korpel Jun 15 '11 at 14:36
    
This doesn't work because Person is not defined. – brymck Jun 15 '11 at 14:37
    
@Bryan: Correct, because of the named function expression: Person is (or at least should be) only available inside of the function itself. – Marcel Korpel Jun 15 '11 at 14:46
1  
@Pete Right. You can actually set aPerson to inherit from Person using your format, but you need to define Person first. The above would work if you just put function Person(){} at the beginning. – brymck Jun 15 '11 at 15:03

I think this comes close to An 'anonymous type' like in c# (encapsulating a set of read-only properties into a single object without having to explicitly define a type first):

var person = (function(){ 
    var age=22; 

    function getAge(){
      return age;
    }
    return {age: getAge}
 }());

 alert(person.age()); //=> 22

Furthermore javascript is dynamically typed, so it doesn't know/use types like you are used to in C#. In other words, in javascript you don't have to type the variables you assign. Type checking is done run time. I don't think it's useful to mimic c# or other languages in JS. Take your time to learn more about it and you'll see it's a different paradigm. As always I recommend the javascript pages of Douglas Crockford for that.

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