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I have a timer with fixed timeslice 1s, setitimer(SIGPROF, &timeslice, NULL);. When I run the process with one thread, the sighandler is invoked once in one second. However, if there are two or more threads in the process, they will be two invocations of sighandler per second. Why is this the case? or how to have a timer with fixed frequency, independent of # of running threads.

The runnable code is attached. The printout shows sighandler is invoked twice a sec...(which is not the case when NUM_THREADS is changed to one)

#include <sys/syscall.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/time.h>//itimerval
#include <signal.h>//sigaction, SIGPROF...
#include <pthread.h>//pthread_create()/join()
#include <stdint.h>//uint32_t
#include <stdlib.h>//exit()
using namespace std;

#ifndef NUM_THREADS
#define NUM_THREADS 20
#endif

struct sigaction old_act_;

int init_timer(int which, int musec) {
    struct itimerval timeslice;
    timeslice.it_interval.tv_sec = musec / 1000000;
    timeslice.it_interval.tv_usec = musec % 1000000;
    timeslice.it_value.tv_sec = musec / 1000000;
    timeslice.it_value.tv_usec = musec % 1000000;
    setitimer(which, &timeslice, NULL);
    return 0;
}

void remove_timer(int which)
{
    struct itimerval timeslice;
    timeslice.it_interval.tv_sec = 0;
    timeslice.it_interval.tv_usec = 0;
    timeslice.it_value.tv_sec = 0;
    timeslice.it_value.tv_usec = 0;
    setitimer(which, &timeslice, NULL);
}

void install_handler(int signo, void(*handler)(int))
{
    sigset_t set;
    struct sigaction act;
    act.sa_handler = handler;
    act.sa_flags = SA_RESTART;
    sigaction(signo, &act, &old_act_);
    sigemptyset(&set);
    sigaddset(&set, signo);
    sigprocmask(SIG_UNBLOCK, &set, NULL);
    return;
}

void uninstall_handler(int signo, bool to_block_signal)
{
    sigaction(signo, &old_act_, 0);
    if(to_block_signal)
    {
        // block the signal
        sigset_t set;
        sigemptyset(&set);
        sigaddset(&set, signo);
        sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &set, NULL);
    }
}

void handler(int signo)
{
    pid_t tid = syscall(SYS_gettid);
    pid_t pid = syscall(SYS_getpid);
    struct timeval now;
    gettimeofday(&now, NULL);
    printf("sig %d, pid %d, tid %d, time = %u.%06u\n", signo, static_cast<int>(pid), static_cast<int>(tid), static_cast<uint32_t>(now.tv_sec), static_cast<uint32_t>(now.tv_usec));
}

void * threadRun(void * threadId)
{
    for(uint64_t i = 0; i < 10000000000; i++)
    {
        //sleep(1);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int tick_musec = 1000000;
    init_timer(ITIMER_PROF, tick_musec);
    install_handler(SIGPROF, handler);

    pthread_t threads[NUM_THREADS];
    long t;
    for (t = 0; t < NUM_THREADS; t++) {
        printf("In main: creating thread %ld\n", t);
        if (pthread_create(&threads[t], NULL, threadRun, (void *) t)) {
            printf("ERROR; return from pthread_create()\n");
            exit(-1);
        }
    }
    void * status;
    for (t = 0; t < NUM_THREADS; t++) {
        if(pthread_join(threads[t], &status)) {
          printf("ERROR; return from pthread_join()\n");
          exit(-1);
        }
        printf("Main: completed join with thread %ld having a status of %ld\n", t, (long) status);
    }

    remove_timer(ITIMER_PROF);
    uninstall_handler(SIGPROF, true);
    printf("Main: program completed. Exiting.\n");
    return 0;
}

Following is the output, when running on a machine with 4 dual-core processors.

sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21544, core 6, time = 1308168237.023219
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21544, core 6, time = 1308168237.276228
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21549, core 6, time = 1308168237.528200
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21545, core 7, time = 1308168237.781441
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21551, core 6, time = 1308168238.037210
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21554, core 6, time = 1308168238.294218
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21551, core 6, time = 1308168238.951221
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21546, core 0, time = 1308168239.064665
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21561, core 1, time = 1308168239.335642
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21558, core 1, time = 1308168240.122650
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21555, core 6, time = 1308168240.148192
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21556, core 1, time = 1308168240.445638
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21543, core 7, time = 1308168240.702424
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21559, core 1, time = 1308168240.958635
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21555, core 6, time = 1308168241.210182
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21550, core 7, time = 1308168241.464426
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21553, core 0, time = 1308168241.725650
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21555, core 6, time = 1308168241.982178
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21547, core 7, time = 1308168242.234422
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21560, core 0, time = 1308168242.503647
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21546, core 0, time = 1308168242.766902
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21550, core 7, time = 1308168243.018414
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21552, core 0, time = 1308168243.270643
sig 27, pid 21542, tid 21550, core 7, time = 1308168243.556412

Edit: I have kinda solved the problem (also see @n.m.'s answer). The reason sighandler runs more frequently on multi-processor machine is that SIGPROF is sent out based on CPU time not real time. CPU time can be bigger than real time, like if there is 2 sec in CPU time, it could be that one process has two threads running concurrently on 2 CPUs during 1 sec.

share|improve this question
    
Install the signal handler after creating the threads but before joining on them? –  Kevin Jun 15 '11 at 15:55
1  
How many cores does your CPU have? Try this on a quad-core machine with 20 threads, or disable one core and see what happens. –  n.m. Jun 15 '11 at 16:30
    
@Kevin relocating sighandler install does not work... @n.m. the machine is with 2 dual-core processor. Does not work, when running with 20 threads –  Richard Jun 15 '11 at 17:45
    
@n.m. as just verified, this is related to # of processors in the system. when it runs on 4-processor (dual core, each) system, sighandler is invoked 4 times a second (even with 8 threads). One thing confusing is that now there are totally 8 cores, why not handler is invoked 8 times a second? –  Richard Jun 15 '11 at 19:02
1  
I dunno, perhaps the system is configured not to give all its power to a single process or user. Anyway, this particular kind of timer represents cpu-seconds spent by the process. If there's N CPUs, the process can spend up to N cpu-seconds each second (but can spend less if say other processes compete with it for CPUs). –  n.m. Jun 15 '11 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

You can use pthread_sigmask(...) to block the SIGPROF in the created threads. In fact, it's recommended to have only one thread handling all the signals.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. Just out of curious, when there are more than one thread, only one should receive the signal. also when there are 3 or more threads, handler runs at the same rate. That's what I am confused about this program. –  Richard Jun 15 '11 at 17:50

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