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I have a method which besides some other actions also modify one of the arguments. For example:

public void DoSomeStuffAndModifyList(List<int> list)
{
   ...
   list.Add(newElement);
}

It looks for me that the name of the method is not enough for pointing on this. May be the whole approach is wrong or there could be ref or out used?

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1  
Does it really need to modify the list? Why can't you return the element you would have added? Then it's up to caller to do with it what they will. –  I82Much Jun 15 '11 at 15:20
    
Why mutate the list at all? Return a new list with the modifications. –  asawyer Jun 15 '11 at 15:20
1  
what is the problem here ? "it looks for me that the name of the method is not enough for pointing on this" - is not clear enough –  Illuminati Jun 15 '11 at 15:21
4  
The fact that you have "And" in the method name suggests that the method has two responsibilities. Split it into two methods, each with one responsibility. –  John Saunders Jun 15 '11 at 15:23
    
it's already splitted. This the method that calls those 2 methods. so what should I do? –  Hun1Ahpu Jun 15 '11 at 15:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a descriptive name for your method / arguments

public void FillItems(string foo,IList<Item> itemsToFeed)
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+1 this is a collecting parameter –  Jordão Jun 15 '11 at 16:26
    
It's in these cases that I really like Obj-C's method signatures being parameter-based. -(void)AddItemsFor:(NSString*)user ToList:(NSMutableArray*)list) –  Florian Doyon Jun 15 '11 at 20:38

Do not use ref unless it is actually necessary.

If your method is

void DoSomething(List<int> list)
{
    list.Add(whatever);
}

Adding ref is not useful. You are doing nothing that requires it, only adding additional complexity for no benefit, and possibly making the method harder to reason about for a maintenance programmer.

Use ref when your method can actually change list by pointing it to something other than the original list. This can be a completely new list, another existing list, or null. And only use ref when you want this change to be visible at the caller.

For your method, explore refactoring it so that maybe adding or removing items from the list is not necessary. After you've done this, absolutely name the method appropriately. After you have done that, utilize the method and parameter summary comments to convey information you think is useful.

/// <summary>
/// Describe the method andhere
/// </summary>
/// <param name="list">Describe what's relevant about the parameter here.</param>

Don't abuse the ref keyword, do appropriate refactoring, do use documentation.

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use ObservableCollection<T> and fire CollectionChanged event when it changed http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms668604.aspx

or you can make your method as exentsion method like that

public static List<int> DoSomeStuffAndModifyList(this List<int> list)
{
 ...
 list.Add(newElement);
 return list;
}
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How about returning a new list:

public List<int> DoSomeStuff(List<int> list)
{
    ...
    return list.Concat(new[] { newElement });
}
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Wouldn't Concat be more appropriate here, if you're trying to mimic the behaviour of List<T>.Add? –  LukeH Jun 15 '11 at 15:30
    
that was my favorite choice, but I'm not sure that it's descriptive enough, it pretends that the argument is not modified inside the method but the new value is returned –  Hun1Ahpu Jun 15 '11 at 15:31
    
@LukeH, you are correct. Concat would be more adapted to mimic the adding. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 15 '11 at 15:34
    
@Hun1Ahpu, exactly, that's why it is descriptive. Like all LINQ extension methods do. They return new values. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 15 '11 at 15:35

I am slightly confused on your question. Are you asking how to name your methods?

You should break your your actions into different methods. I wouldn't worry to much about the method that calls these actions. As long as it is descriptive enough, that should be fine.

As John Saunders said, split your methods for single responsibility.

public List<int> GetList()
{
   //return list
}

public void ModifyList(List<int> list)
{
  //Modify list, you could return if you wanted to.
}

//Call 2 methods
List<int> list = GetList();
ModifyList(list);
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It's already broken on 2 methods, this is the method that calls those methods. –  Hun1Ahpu Jun 15 '11 at 15:26
    
@Hun1Ahpu why do you need this method to call these 2 methods? Is DoSomeStuffAndModifyList have some logic beside calling these methods? –  Amir Ismail Jun 15 '11 at 15:29
    
To follow up with what Micropressor said, if all your DoSomeStuffAndModifyList is calling 2 methods, why not just directly call the 2 methods after each other. –  Xaisoft Jun 15 '11 at 15:35
    
because they are used in many places in couple. –  Hun1Ahpu Jun 15 '11 at 15:40

Create an extension method.

public static class ListExtensions
{
    public static void DoSomeStuffAndModifyList(this List<int> list)
    {
       ...
       list.Add(newElement);
    }
)

And to call it:

var gradeList = new List<int>();
gradeList.DoSomeStuffAndModifyList();
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