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I've got a class that I want make sure the Complete method complete gets called ...somehow. For example:

public class Order
{
    public Guid TransactionId {get; private set;}
    public void Complete(Guid transactionId)
    {
        TransactionId = transactionId;
    }
}

How can i ensure that the Complete method gets called by clients?

public class Cart
{
    public void Process()
    {
        Order o = new Order();
        // Do stuff
        o.Complete(GetTransactionId());
    }
}

The above code seems weak in that its feasible that the complete methods does not get called:

public class Cart
{
    public void Process()
    {
        Order o = new Order();
        // Do stuff
    }
} 

Heard about events but not too sure if that is the correct solution...Any ideas?

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Why do you think the Complete() method won't be called in Process()? –  carlbenson Jun 15 '11 at 15:50
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3 Answers 3

You could make it implement IDisposable and always create a new order within a using statement. That way you can control when the Complete method gets called.

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Absolutely the right answer. Correctly implemented, this will guarantee that Complete gets called (in all cases, eventually). –  spender Jun 15 '11 at 15:51
    
Then, what's the meaning of storing the transaction ID in the object if it's disposing? –  manji Jun 15 '11 at 15:53
    
@manji: Hmmm, i guess you could throw on disposing if complete wasn't called. –  George Duckett Jun 15 '11 at 15:55
    
I don't see it being stored in the object. I see it being supplied as a parameter in a fairly invariant way. There's no reason this could not be encapsulated in the disposal method of the Order if the Order has the right stuff to hand. –  spender Jun 15 '11 at 15:57
    
Either way is fine. The order either needs the transaction so it can call complete its self, or it needs to know whether complete was called so it can throw. –  George Duckett Jun 15 '11 at 15:59
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The only way that would not get called is if there was an exception or some other behavior that caused it not to progress to the next statement (ie, catastrophic failure).

You can guard against an exception preventing it from happening by putting it in a finally block:

public void Process()
{
    try {
        Order o = new Order();
        // Do stuff
    } finally { 
        o.Complete(GetTransactionId());
    }
}
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You want to force the user of an Order to remember to complete it, is that it? If it is the user's choice when to call Complete() then that's gonna be hard. I guess that you either want the complete to be automatically done after something else that is done with the order or you have to somehow make sure that it will be obvious to the user that he forgot to complete it.

It is hard to know without more details of what an order is and how it is used.

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