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I am doing this:

var command = new SqlCommand(query, myConnection);
                foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
                {
                    query = @"update FileLog set
                    FaxStatus=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[0].ToString() + "'," +
                    "FaxedPageCount=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[1].ToString() + "'," +
                    "dtFaxed=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[2].ToString() + "'," +
                    "RetryCount=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[4].ToString() + "' " +
                    "where JobID=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[3].ToString() + "'";
                    command = new SqlCommand(query, myConnection);
                   command.ExecuteNonQuery();

                }

JobID is a uniqueidentifier

And I am getting this error:

Conversion failed when converting from a character string to uniqueidentifier.

What am I doing wrong?

The JobID field looks like this:

DB9424E5-1E73-4108-A855-B252E516A2A2
2EB17B8B-C0A1-46FE-82AF-37AEF2A8A6EC
C24F0460-7667-4A3A-8D8F-64B9728C2359
8DCDB020-8C7B-493E-9D21-719CBAFC16B6
share|improve this question
    
First of all, either use StringBuilder or better yet String.Format(...) to avoid those nasty staggered strings being built. You could even use both! It's also more efficient than creating multiple gobs of string objects just to return ONE string. –  michael Jun 15 '11 at 17:14
    
Is it definitely the JobID column (no other uniqueidentifier columns involved)? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 15 '11 at 17:15
1  
Also, parameterized queries are your friend - don't build SQL up as a string. Write the query once, then plug in parameters –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 15 '11 at 17:15
    
@dami yes it is the only one –  Yuck Jun 15 '11 at 17:18
    
@michael, I looked at this in IL, and it compiles down to a String.Concat. I don't think performance is a valid reason here, but I totally agree that readability is affected. –  agent-j Jun 15 '11 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

This will be more secure (safe from SQL-injection), easer to read and understand, and faster because prepared statements get their execution plan cached. If you have different sql, it can't use a cached execution plan.

     SqlCommand cmd =
        new SqlCommand(
           @"update FileLog set FaxStatus=@fs, FaxedPageCount=@ct, @dtFaxed=@dt, ......., where JobID=@id")
        {CommandType = CommandType.Text};
     cmd.Prepare();
     cmd.Connection = connection;
     cmd.Parameters["@id"].Value = row.ItemArray[0];
     ...
share|improve this answer
    
You may want to create a new Guid(row.ItemArray[3]), like @esasitincy suggested. –  agent-j Jun 15 '11 at 17:31
    
@downvoter... Don't be a hater. ;-) A comment would be nice to see how I can improve my answer. –  agent-j Jun 15 '11 at 17:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

i found the solution. turns out you need to do this:

                var command = new SqlCommand(query, myConnection);
                foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
                {
                    query = @"update FileLog set
                    FaxStatus=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[0].ToString() + "'," +
                    "FaxedPageCount=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[1].ToString() + "'," +
                    "dtFaxed=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[2].ToString() + "'," +
                    "BiscomCode=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[5].ToString() + "', " +
                    "RetryCount=" + "'" + row.ItemArray[4].ToString() + "' " +
                    "where CONVERT(VARCHAR(255), JobID) =" + "'" + row.ItemArray[3].ToString() + "'";
                    command = new SqlCommand(query, myConnection);
                   command.ExecuteNonQuery();

                }

you have to convert it to a varchar first

share|improve this answer
    
I know why it works, but I don't think it's optimal solution. It's making the database recast all the JobIDs and then compare, when you can check first if the jobId is well formed. It's quite okay to compare a uniqueidentifier field with a text string as long as the string is a valid guid. So, { select * from filelog where JobID='DB9424E5-1E73-4108-A855-B252E516A2A2' } is a valid query. –  Candide Jun 15 '11 at 17:50
    
@downvoter... Don't be a hater. ;-) A comment would be nice to see how I can improve my answer –  Yuck Jun 16 '11 at 16:45
    
Wasn't me. But I upped it. It's not a bad question. –  Candide Jun 17 '11 at 14:19

It's very likely one of your job ids is not a valid Guid.

Here's a method to check for guid:

    public static bool IsGuid(string input)
    {
        Regex isGuid = new Regex(@"^(\{){0,1}[0-9a-fA-F]{8}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}(\}){0,1}$", RegexOptions.Compiled);
        try
        {
            return isGuid.IsMatch(input);
        }
        catch
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

So before issuing the query command do a check on the jobid. If it doesn't match, escape it and log it to revisit later.

share|improve this answer
    
im sorry but how would i solve this problem? –  Yuck Jun 15 '11 at 17:20
    
I've seen this problem with a project, and if the jobid is null or not a valid guid, it will throw that error. I don't think you need to build a new guid as esastincy says above, since this is a only a regex check. Please see method above. –  Candide Jun 15 '11 at 17:25

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