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I need to save all arguments to a vector or something like this. I'm not a programmer, so I don't know how to do it, but here's what I've got so far. I just want to call a function system to pass all arguments after.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream"
#include "vector"
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
       for (int i=1; i<argc; i++)
       {
           if(strcmp(argv[i], "/all /renew") == 0)
           {
                 system("\"\"c:\\program files\\internet explorer\\iexplore.exe\" \"www.stackoverflow.com\"\"");
           }
           else
              system("c:\\windows\\system32\\ipconfig.exe"+**All Argv**);
       }

       return 0;
}
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2  
Note: argv contains the tokens separated by whitespace, so I doubt it will ever contain both /all and /renew. –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

i need to save all arguments to a vector or something

You can use the range constructor of the vector and pass appropriate iterators:

std::vector<std::string> arguments(argv + 1, argv + argc);

Not 100% sure if that's what you were asking. If not, clarify.

share|improve this answer
    
(silently replaces a for loop in his own code by a range constructor in the initializer list. Repeat after me: "a class constructor shall not do any work, a class constructor must not do any work") –  rubenvb Jun 15 '11 at 17:28
2  
@rubenvb: why blindly comply to a principle that asks you to write more code for no apparent reason? –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:31
    
@rubenvb - 1) why must a class constructor do no work? 2) Perhaps you'd prefer vector<string> args; args.insert(args.end(), argv+1, argv+argc); –  Robᵩ Jun 15 '11 at 17:31
    
@Fred: from OP's use case, it seems the required output is not the vector itself, but a concatenation of the arguments... –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:32
1  
@rebenvb: the exception being thrown out of the constructor is a feature! Why would you want a partially constructed object? –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:38

To build string with all argument concatenated and then run a command based on those arguments, you can use something like:

#include <string>
using namespace std;
string concatenate ( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    if (argc < 1) {
        return "";
    }
    string result(argv[0]);
    for (int i=1; i < argc; ++i) {
        result += " ";
        result += argv[i];
    }
    return result;
}
int main ( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    const string arguments = concatenate(argc-1, argv+1);
    if (arguments == "/all /renew") {
        const string program = "c:\\windows\\system32\\ipconfig.exe";
        const string command = program + " " + arguments;
        system(command.c_str());
    } else {
        system("\"\"c:\\program files\\internet explorer\\iexplore.exe\" \"www.stackoverflow.com\"\"");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note: for a better string concatenation, use stringstream instead. –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:35
    
@André: and for better performance generally (not that this particular use case will slow you down much...) –  rubenvb Jun 15 '11 at 17:43
    
Edit: fixed bug in concatenation, spaces are required. –  André Caron Jun 15 '11 at 17:50
    
@Andre Caron Why is stringstream better for concatenation? std::string supports concatenation directly; std::ostringstream is for formatting output. –  James Kanze Jun 15 '11 at 18:12
    
@James: the difference is not as explicit when using operator+= with the string because most implementations give it a nice allocation policy (they grow quick). However, repeated use of operator+ will likely perform one allocation per concatenation. –  André Caron Jun 16 '11 at 15:40

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