Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using backbone.js, here is a quick test to demonstrate the problem I am facing with nested models.

Preface I have a Obj Model that contains 2 nested models, Obj1 and Obj2. The Obj model itself has a View (ObjView), and there is a View for the main page itself (BodyView).

The main page has a single button, id=add. Each time the button is clicked, a new Obj is added to the ObjCollection, and the ObjView adds a button (id=clickMe) to the page. The clickMe button is bound to a testFunc that console.logs this.model and this.model.get("obj1").

Problem From inspecting the console.logs, I see that while each Obj is a new instance, their nested Obj1 point to the same instance of an obj1! But each instance of Obj is obviously supposed to have their own instances of the nested models obj1 and obj2.

Any help appreciated.

$(document).ready(function(){

    var Obj1 = Backbone.Model.extend({
        defaults:{
            Attr1A   : false,
            Attr1B   : false
        }
    })

    var Obj2 = Backbone.Model.extend({
        defaults:{
            Attr2A   : false,
            Attr2B   : false
        }
    })

    var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
        defaults: {
            obj1    : new Obj1(),
            obj2    : new Obj2()
        }
    })

    var ObjCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
        model: Obj
    });


    var ObjView = Backbone.View.extend({

        initialize: function(){
            _.bindAll(this, 'render', 'testFunc');
            this.model.bind('change', this.render);
            this.model.view = this;

            $("body").append(this.render().el);
        },

        events: {
            "click #clickMe" : "testFunc"
        },

        render: function(){
            $(this.el).html('<input type ="button" id="clickMe" value="Click">')
            return this;
        },

        testFunc: function(){
            console.log(this.model); //returns Obj models with unique cids
            console.log(this.model.get("obj1")); //returns Obj1 models with the SAME cid!
        }
    });


    var BodyView = Backbone.View.extend({
        el: $('body'),

        events:{
            "click #add"  : "addObj"
        },

        initialize: function(){
            _.bindAll(this, 'render', 'addObj')
            this.collection = new ObjCollection();
            this.collection.bind('add', this.appendObj); 
        },

        addObj: function(){
            var myObj = new Obj();
            this.collection.add(myObj);
        },

        appendObj: function(myObj){
            var objView = new ObjView({
                model: myObj
            });
        }
    });
    var bodyView = new BodyView;

});

The html page is just the following with jQuery and backbone loaded.

<body>
    <input type ="button" id="add" value="Add">
</body>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

fortuneRice, when a Backbone model gets initialized, the super.constructor moves the defaults to the internal attributes array, where model.get looks for "obj1". Prusse's example initializes the obj1 and obj2 values with new objects for each instance, but doesn't move the values to the internal attributes array. Here is my modification of Prusse's solution.

var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        myDefaults = {
            obj1: new Obj1();
            obj2: new Obj2();
        }
        this.set(myDefaults);
});

jQuery's extend method would combine the two objects. You could declare the non-object references with defaults and the object references with myDefaults in the initialize method.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the clear explanation. –  fortuneRice Jun 15 '11 at 22:04
    
why not use this.set(myDefaults) instead of $().extend(...)? Internally it does the same thing, and will have the same effect, but I believe using set is cleaner. –  idbentley Jun 16 '11 at 0:30
    
@idbentley oh I guess you could do that! Didn't even think of it, but yeah, it'd be cleaner. You'd trigger the change event by using set, but you could use the silent option so I guess that really doesn't matter. –  c3rin Jun 30 '11 at 19:58

With:

var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        obj1    : new Obj1(),
        obj2    : new Obj2()
    }
})

You are saying that you want all objects created with "Obj" to have the same "obj1" and "obj2" values, use:

var Obj = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.obj1 = new Obj1();
        this.obj2 = new Obj2();
    }
});

To achieve what you seen to want. http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#Model-constructor

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help, but I'm not sure why this.model.get("obj1") now gives me undefined? I thought it would default to returning an instance of Obj1. Any ideas? –  fortuneRice Jun 15 '11 at 21:00
    
@fortuneRice Try this.get("obj1"), obj1 is not a attribute of the "class" Obj but of the instances of Obj. –  Prusse Jun 15 '11 at 21:16
    
thanks for the follow up; I accepted c3rin's solution based on the explanation regarding the internal attributes array. –  fortuneRice Jun 15 '11 at 22:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.